MRS Proceedings

Articles

Distributed Recycling of Post-Consumer Plastic Waste in Rural Areas

2012 MRS Fall Meeting.

M. Kreigera1, G. C. Anzalonea2, M. L. Muldera1, A. Glovera1 and J. M Pearcea1a3 c1

a1 Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, United States.

a2 Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, United States.

a3 Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, United States.

ABSTRACT

Although the environmental benefits of recycling plastics are well established and most geographic locations within the U.S. offer some plastic recycling, recycling rates are often low. Low recycling rates are often observed in conventional centralized recycling plants due to the challenge of collection and transportation for high-volume low-weight polymers. The recycling rates decline further when low population density, rural and relatively isolated communities are investigated because of the distance to recycling centers makes recycling difficult and both economically and energetically inefficient. The recent development of a class of open source hardware tools (e.g. RecycleBots) able to convert post-consumer plastic waste to polymer filament for 3-D printing offer a means to increase recycling rates by enabling distributed recycling. In addition, to reducing the amount of plastic disposed of in landfills, distributed recycling may also provide low-income families a means to supplement their income with domestic production of small plastic goods. This study investigates the environmental impacts of polymer recycling. A life-cycle analysis (LCA) for centralized plastic recycling is compared to the implementation of distributed recycling in rural areas. Environmental impact of both recycling scenarios is quantified in terms of energy use per unit mass of recycled plastic. A sensitivity analysis is used to determine the environmental impacts of both systems as a function of distance to recycling centers. The results of this LCA study indicate that distributed recycling of HDPE for rural regions is energetically favorable to either using virgin resin or conventional recycling processes. This study indicates that the technical progress in solar photovoltaic devices, open-source 3-D printing and polymer filament extrusion have made distributed polymer recycling and upcycling technically viable.

Key Words:

  • Recycling;
  • polymer;
  • environmentally benign

Correspondence

c1 corresponding author: pearce@mtu.edu

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