Production

     

Production Values

At Cambridge Journals we provide a production service that is fast, responsive, effective and reliable.Our constant aim is to publish papers with maximum speed, accuracy and efficiency, thereby best serving the needs of all those who commission a production service from Cambridge Journals. We are acutely aware of the need to publish research as quickly as possible and we have streamlined our production processes to ensure that content reaches the research community as soon as possible without compromising our trademark high standards.

We offer a positive author experience, taking full responsibility for content management. In all production steps from receiving the accepted manuscript through to publication online via our own online platform Cambridge Journals Online and publication in print of the highest quality, we always ensure that our exacting and high standards are maintained.

It is our constant endeavour to provide consistently high quality end products, to schedule, at the optimum price. We always aim to exceed author expectations and make it a positive experience publishing with Cambridge Journals.

Our Production FAQs below are designed to help answer the most commonly asked questions. If you have any comments about these FAQs, or any queries about journals production that are not answered here then please contact us.

Production FAQs

Click on a question below to go directly to the answer

Submission of articles

Proofs

Copyright

Online publication

After publication

Permissions/copyright

Go to top

Submission of articles

How do I submit an article for publication?

Each journal has its own style requirements and specific instructions for submitting articles for publication. You can find these instructions on the inside cover of any recent issue, or on the journal's home page. Once you have found the journal's home page, open the Journal Information sidebar and click on Instructions for Contributors.

Go to top

How do I find a journal's home page?

Go to Cambridge Journals Online then follow the navigation link Browse journals in the left sidebar. You can choose to search for a particular journal By Title or By Subject. Once you are in the journal's home page you will find navigation links to Editorial Board, Instructions for Contributors and other useful information by opening Journal Information in the sidebar.

Go to top

What files can you use?

Each journal has specific instructions on preferred file formats. Please go to the journal's home page, open the Journal Information sidebar and click on Instructions for Contributors.

Go to top

I have submitted an article to one of your journals. Can you tell me when it will appear in print?

Articles submitted for publication go through a peer review process prior to being accepted. If you have not received notification that your article has been accepted, please contact the editor of the journal to enquire about it.

Once your article has been accepted, it is submitted to production to arrange copy editing and typesetting. If the journal publishes articles as FirstView (online ahead of print publication) then it can take from 2 to 6 weeks from acceptance before you will receive a proof of your article to check.

If the journal does not publish articles as FirstView, the editors may need to wait for all articles in an issue to complete peer review before production can start. Therefore it can take longer before you will receive a proof of your article to check.

Go to top

What format should I supply my figures in?

To ensure that your figures are reproduced to the highest possible standards and your article is published as quickly and efficiently as possible, please go to http://journals.cambridge.org/artworkguide.

Go to top

How much would it cost to have my figures printed in colour?

Some journals allow colour figures but authors may be charged for this. Please consult the journal editor about the policy for colour figures.

Many journals do not allow colour at all but the journal editor will be able to advise on this.

Go to top

I want to provide supplementary material to my article. What do I do?

Supplementary materials are not copy edited or typeset but are loaded to CJO in exactly the format supplied by authors. Supplementary material must be submitted at the same time as your article and must be clearly identified to distinguish it from the main article text.

Authors should ensure that they mention within their article that supplementary material is available on CJO.

Go to top

My email address has changed since my article was accepted for publication. What can I do?

You must notify production of any changes to your email address. If you do not, then the pdf proof of your article will be undeliverable and the publication of your article will be delayed.

Also once your article has been published you will be sent a final pdf for your records so it is important that we have your current email address.

Go to top

Proofs

What proofs will I receive and how will I get these?

The first named (or the nominated corresponding author) will be sent an email with a pdf proof, or a web link to the pdf proof.

The pdf may also include copyright and offprint forms (as appropriate) and full instructions on what you need to do with the proof.

Go to top

Will I receive a hardcopy proof of my article to check?

You will not be sent any hardcopy proofs.

Go to top

I have just received my proof, what do I do?

You will need Adobe Reader to open your pdf. You can download a free copy of this software here.

The email you receive notifying you that your proof is available includes full instructions with contact details of the proof collator. Please follow these instructions carefully or publication of your article may be delayed.

It is your responsibility to check your proof very carefully. Errors not found may appear in the published journal. Please ensure you answer all author queries sent with your proof.

Note however, that this is not the time to rewrite large sections of your text. Corrections must be confined to typographical errors only.

Go to top

What is a proof collator?

The proof collator is the person who coordinates receipt of all author corrections for a particular journal and ensures they are forwarded to production to arrange correction. The full contact details of your proof collator will be provided in the instructions you receive with your pdf proof.

Go to top

How do I mark my corrections?

A pdf showing the standard proof marking symbols will be sent to you with your proof. You can download a copy of this by clicking here.

If you have only very minor corrections you can email these to the proof collator. Please note that you must clearly specify what the corrections are, and refer to page and line numbers in the proof.

You must mark your corrections very clearly to avoid causing any further errors. Please remember that your marked proofs are scanned when returned to the typesetter so any unclear marks or poor handwriting may become unreadable after scanning and introduce errors. Always mark your proofs in blue or black ink.

Although we ask you to write your corrections clearly, please do not write in full capital letters as this makes it impossible for the proof collator or typesetter to know which words must start with a capital letter.

The proof collator has the discretion to ask you to send in a marked hardcopy if the corrections are ambiguous or complex (particularly equations), or if there are very many corrections requested.

Note you cannot send in a completely updated version of your article incorporating your corrections and answers to author queries. If you do this you will be asked to resend all your corrections in the format we originally requested.

Do not reply to the email proof alert or directly to the typesetter. If you have any queries about your proof please contact the proof collator.

Go to top

I have been sent a list of author queries with my pdf. What do I need to do?

You must ensure you provide answers to every query. You can mark your answers directly onto a hardcopy printout of your proof or include the answers in your email to the proof collator. Please note that if you email your corrections, you must clearly specify what the corrections are, and refer to page and line numbers in the proof.

Go to top

When do you need my proof corrections back?

We generally require your corrections to be returned within 2 to 4 working days. Please check the instructions sent to you with your proof for the deadline and details of where to return your corrections. It is important that you attend to your proof as soon as possible so that publication is not delayed.

Go to top

I don't have any corrections. What do I need to do?

If you have checked your proof carefully and do not wish to make any corrections, please email the proof collator and tell them you are happy for the proof to be published as it is. However, do not forget to return your copyright form and offprint forms (if any).

Go to top

I have received a proof and see that my article has been changed after it was accepted. Why has it been changed?

After an article is accepted, it is copy edited to ensure it conforms to the journal style, and to correct any spelling or grammatical errors. Generally the changes are not major. If major changes are required the article will be referred back to the journal editors. If you believe that changes have been made which are inaccurate then please clearly mark the correction you require.

Go to top

I am ready to send back my proof, who do I need to contact?

The email you receive notifying you that your proof is available includes full instructions with contact details of the proof collator. Please follow these instructions.

If you send your corrections by post there is no need to email the proof collator or production just to inform them that the proof is on its way.

Go to top

I can't return the proofs within your deadline. What shall I do?

You should return your proof as soon as you can even if this is after the deadline has passed. However, if you are away for any significant time you should nominate a co-author to check the proof for you, or if this is not possible please email the proof collator to let them know when you may be able to return the proof. It is important that you attend to your proof as soon as possible so that publication is not delayed.

Go to top

I have already returned my corrections to the proof collator but I've just spotted some more errors. What can I do?

Please email the proof collator who will be able to advise if it is still possible to make the correction. The proof collator may need to refer this to production for a decision. If your article is published online ahead of print publication (we refer to this as FirstView publication) it may be too late to accept further corrections. However if your article is not already published as a FirstView article we can usually accept further corrections. But it is always best to try to avoid this situation happening by checking your proofs very carefully.

Go to top

I returned my proof corrections a week ago. Why isn't my article published?

Generally we allow 2 weeks for an article to be corrected and uploaded to CJO (it can be much quicker than this). You can check if your article is online by visiting the journal's home page and clicking on FirstView.

A few journals do not publish articles as FirstView (online ahead of print publication). For these journals, articles are not corrected individually but are only corrected when an issue is ready for production, so there may be some delay before your article is published. Refer to your journal's home page for further information.

Go to top

I returned my proof corrections several weeks ago and I have just been sent another pdf. What is this for?

If you are publishing in a FirstView journal then as soon as your article has been corrected, it is published online on CJO. The first named (or nominated corresponding) author is sent a pdf of the final published version to distribute among co-authors. It is not another proof and you cannot make any further corrections to it. You will also receive another pdf once your article is published in an issue.

If your journal is not a FirstView journal then you will receive a pdf of the final published version as soon as the whole issue is published on CJO.

Go to top

Will I get a pdf of my final article?

Yes. you will receive a pdf of your FirstView article plus a pdf of the final published version as soon as the whole issue is published on CJO.

If your journal is not a FirstView journal then you will only receive a pdf of the final published version when the whole issue is published on CJO.

Go to top

Copyright

Why do I need to sign a copyright form?

It is a legal requirement that we cannot publish any article without receiving a signed copyright form from the author. If we do not receive your signed copyright form, we cannot publish your article.

Please click here to see what rights you retain after signing the copyright form.

Go to top

Can I email my signed copyright and offprint forms as pdfs?

Yes, email signed pdfs to the name/email address given on each of the forms.

Go to top

I was told my article had been accepted but I have never received a pdf proof to check

It can take from 2 to 6 weeks from acceptance of your article until proofs are sent out. If you have still not received a proof after this time please email production. There may be a problem with the email address you supplied, your server may be rejecting the pdf proof, or there may be other reasons for the proof being delayed.

Also it is general policy that proofs are only sent to the first named (or the nominated corresponding) author.

Go to top

How can I contact production?

The proof notice you receive will give details of your Press production contact. If you have any queries prior to proof stage then email the journal editor.

Your Press production contact can help you with any questions you may have about production matters; but if you have any queries about corrections to your proof then please contact the proof collator.

Go to top

Online publication

What is Cambridge Journals Online (CJO)?

Cambridge Journals Online is the online content delivery service for Cambridge University Press's collection of over 300 leading journals across the sciences, social sciences and humanities.

All visitors to the site can

  • read tables of contents and abstracts for all Cambridge journals
  • search the full text of articles
  • keep up to date with the latest research in their field by receiving RSS/Atom news feeds

For more information click here and click on the navigation tab 'Authors'.

Go to top

What exactly do you mean by FirstView publication?

The majority of Cambridge journals publish individual articles online ahead of print publication. Articles are corrected and published online as soon as possible after they are corrected. This means that articles are published very quickly and publication is not delayed until they can be included in a print issue. This is what we call FirstView.

The first named (or nominated corresponding) author will receive a pdf of the FirstView article plus a pdf of the final published version as soon as the whole issue is published on CJO.

Go to top

When will my article be published online?

If your journal is a FirstView journal, then articles are generally published online within 2 to 3 weeks of receipt of your corrected proof. You can check if your article is online by visiting your journal's home page and following the links to FirstView articles. Also the first named (or nominated corresponding) author will be sent a pdf of the FirstView article.

If your journal is not a FirstView journal, then articles are only published online when the whole issue is published. This may mean you will not be sent the pdf of your final published version for several weeks, depending on the frequency of publication of your journal.

But once the issue is published online the first named (or nominated corresponding) author will be sent a pdf of the final published version to distribute among co-authors.

Go to top

I received a FirstView pdf and now I have received another pdf. What is this for?

In addition to the pdf sent when your article was published as FirstView, you will also receive a final pdf once your article appears in an issue. The only change from your FirstView pdf is that it cites the journal volume and issue number and is paginated as it appears in the issue.

It is not another proof and you cannot make any further corrections to it.

Go to top

I've seen my article on CJO but I can't get access to the full text. What can I do?

To view the full text of your article you must be a subscriber/registered user - click here for further information.

Go to top

How should I cite my article if it is published online?

You should cite the author/article title/journal title information followed by its published online date and doi. For example

Lazerson, Samuel A. and Wiechen, Heinz M. Three-dimensional simulations of magnetic reconnection in a dusty plasma. Journal of Plasma Physics, doi: 10.1017/S0022377807006861, Published online by Cambridge University Press 27 November 2007.

The published online date establishes the copyright date for your article and the doi is the unique number which enables other readers to access your article.

Go to top

What is a doi?

The doi (digital object identifier) is a string of numbers which together uniquely identify a published article. The doi is permanently assigned to each article, and provides a persistent link to current information about that article, including where the article, or information about it, can be found on the Internet. It enables readers to find the article on the Internet irrespective of any subsequent changes in the web site structure, in the management responsibility of the journal in which it was first published, or the location of the web site on which the journal is hosted.

For more information about dois, see www.doi.org or www.crossref.org.

Go to top

Can I create a web address to my paper using the doi?

To convert a doi to a web address you need to add a prefix to the doi. For papers published on CJO use the url prefix http://dx.doi.org/

For example, assuming your paper has doi as follows:

doi:10.1017/S1368980008002541

Your web address will then be:

http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1017/S1368980008002541

You can use the url string within any documents you write, or you can simply copy and paste it into your browser.

The url will lead to the abstract page of your paper on CJO, from which the full text can be accessed as HTML or PDF.

Go to top

I have just received my FirstView pdf and have found an error. Can I get this corrected?

Articles published online as FirstView articles are considered 'published' and can be cited and quoted using the doi as the reference source.

Although technology will allow changes to online articles very easily compared to articles published in print issues, it is Press policy (in common with most major journal publishers) not to allow any subsequent changes to articles published online. Changes cannot be allowed because of the potential for confusion if authors are able to refer to different versions of the same article.

If a significant error is discovered after online publication you should contact production to decide if there is a need to publish a separate corrigendum/erratum linked to the online version.

Please note that simple typographical errors are not considered serious enough to warrant publishing an erratum.

Go to top

My article is now online. When will it appear in a printed issue?

Each journal has its own policy for including articles in print issues and what goes into each issue is usually the journal editor's decision. Many journals also have large forward loads of articles waiting for inclusion in a printed issue. Issues are generally compiled about 6 to 8 weeks before the printed issue cover date. However, online publication confirms that an article is 'published', and it can confidently be cited as such.

Go to top

I've looked at the latest printed issue of your journal and several articles are included which were published online after my article. Why were these articles included but my article was not?

When scheduling articles for any particular issue, the journal editor and/or production take a number of things into account, including: date of submission, date of acceptance, date of online publication, subject balance or theme in an issue, and also length (every journal has a strict annual page budget, and we try to get as close as possible to this). When making the final selection of articles for an issue, date of online publication has to be balanced against all these other factors so may not always be the prime consideration.

Go to top

My article was published in a 2012 print issue but the copyright date is 2011 on the first page. Is this an error?

The copyright date of an article always matches the date an article was first published. As many of our journals are published online ahead of printed issues (FirstView), this means individual articles are published online as soon as they are corrected. It can easily happen that an article may not appear in a printed issue until some months later, possibly the following year - in these cases the journal year of publication will not match the copyright year stated, and this is entirely correct.

Go to top

After publication

Do you have any idea whether my free copies have been sent to me yet?

Each journal has its own policy on providing complimentary copies to authors. If your journal sends out complimentary copies you should allow 6 to 8 weeks for these to be delivered.

Go to top

What are offprints?

Offprints are printed paper copies of a published article, which are produced at the same time as the full issue is printed. Journals have different policies for supplying and charging for offprints so you need to check what the policy is by looking on the inside cover of any current issue.

Increasingly, most journals have decided not to offer free offprints now that authors are sent pdfs of their final published versions.

Go to top

Will I receive any free offprints?

Many journals no longer provide offprints but offer a pdf of the final version instead. Please consult the inside cover of a recent issue for the current policy.

Go to top

I want to order offprints but I have mislaid my form. Where can I get a copy?

Please contact production for a replacement form.

Go to top

How much do offprints cost?

Each journal has its own policy for supplying and charging for offprints so you need to check what the policy is by looking on the inside cover of any recent issue or visiting the journal's home page. The offprint form you receive with your proof will also state the price for various combinations of extent and quantity.

Go to top

I only want my free offprints. Do I need to return my offprint form even if I don't want to order any extras?

Yes you must return the offprint form completed with your full postal address to ensure your free offprints are ordered and sent to the correct address.

Go to top

When can I expect delivery of the offprints I ordered?

You should allow 6-8 weeks after an issue was printed for these to be delivered.

Go to top

I want to change the address I gave for my offprints. Who shall I send this to?

Please contact production as soon as possible and we will amend the information. However, if the journal is printed, your offprints may already have been despatched to the first address you provided and it is your responsibility to trace the offprints at this address.

Go to top

I want to order offprints of my article published in an issue last year. Who should I contact?

You can only order offprints at the time that you receive the offprint form with your pdf proof. Offprints are printed at the same time as the whole issue is printed and cannot be produced after an issue has been printed without incurring high costs.

If you still require printed copies of your article then production can obtain a quote for the cost of reprinting your article.

Go to top

Will I be sent a pdf of the final version of my article?

Yes, once your article is published as FirstView or as part of a whole issue, then the first named (or nominated corresponding author) is sent a pdf to distribute among co-authors.

Go to top

Permissions/copyright

I want to post my article on my own web site, do I need the Press's permission?

Please refer to our "Terms and conditions of use for pdfs" and our explanation of the rights you retain in your published article.

Go to top

Can I use figures from my own article published in a Cambridge Journal in another publication?

General guidelines are available at http://www.cambridge.org/uk/information/rights/authors.htm but authors should always check out the particular terms and conditions on the second page of the Transfer of Copyright form they submitted.

Go to top