JAS Instructions for Contributors

Procedure for Manuscript Submission
Requirements for Manuscript Submission
Article Types Accepted
Contact Information: Books for Review
Submission Rules of Thumb

 

 

Procedure for Manuscript Submission

Manuscripts of 8,000 to 10,000 words and any accompanying figures should be submitted electronically through the Editorial Manager online submission system (http://www.editorialmanager.com/jas/). Low-resolution images and illustrations are acceptable for the review process; all images, tables and figures should include titles or captions. Please note that in the event of publication, the author is responsible for acquiring high-resolution images along with permission to publish them.

All authors are required to read and follow the Cambridge Artwork Guide, available here.

Inquiries may be directed to the Editor at jas@journalofasianstudies.org or by phone: (949) 824-6521. Due to the volume of submissions, we cannot evaluate proposed abstracts or titles, only full submissions. Please send all books for review to the AAS Secretariat in Ann Arbor, Michigan. See Contact Information: Books for Review below.

Please also see the Submission Rules of Thumb.

Requirements for Manuscript Submission

When preparing a manuscript, please note that JAS is committed to publishing articles based on in-depth, original research. Authors should also take care to address the interests of our broad, multidisciplinary readership by raising larger questions of interest that reach beyond their precise research specialties. Authors are encouraged to consult recent issues of JAS for guidance on style and formatting.

Manuscripts submitted to JAS should not have been published elsewhere and should not be under review for publication elsewhere.

Article manuscripts, including notes and references, should range between 8,000 and 10,000 words, or approximately thirty-five pages in length, and must include a 150 word abstract at the beginning of the document.

Authors’ names must be left off of the manuscript, as JAS engages in double-blind reviews.

Manuscripts must be double-spaced with 12-point type and 1 inch margins including extracts, notes, and references, and formatted for letter-size (8.5 x 11 in.) paper if possible.

Notes should be as few as possible and appear at the end of the text.

Use parenthetical in-text citation, and author-date formatting for references per section 15 of the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010).

Please use the following Romanization: Chinese: Pinyin; Japanese: Hepburn; Korean: McCune-Reischauer.

Articles in JAS represent neither the views of the Association for Asian Studies nor those of the JAS editors. The Editor is responsible for the final selection of content of JAS and reserves the right to reject any material deemed inappropriate for publication. Responsibility for opinions expressed and the accuracy of facts published in articles and reviews rests solely with the individual authors.


Article Types Accepted

Research Articles: Most of the articles in the JAS are unsolicited manuscripts submitted by a variety of authors. We get over 250 submissions per year; the acceptance rate is about 8%. We conduct extensive review of promising works, including both in-house and anonymous evaluations, so initial review can take six months, with another year or more until final publication. We expect these pieces to be based on in-depth primary research, but with a reach to scholars outside the disciplinary and geographic specialty of the author. Submissions are limited to 10,000 words including notes and bibliography. Each includes an abstract, author email, and affiliation, limited footnotes, author/date citations, reference list, and acknowledgments. Black and white or color images and tables are allowed upon review by the editorial office. Languages and fonts from across Asia are embedded in the text.
Sample Article: "Convict Carpets: Jails and the Revival of Historic Carpet Design in Colonial India" by Abigail McGowan (72.02)
Sample Article: "Ethnicity, Violence, and Khmer-Vietnamese Relations: The Significance of the Lower Mekong Delta, 1757–1954" by Shawn McHale (72.02)

Asia Beyond the Headlines: These are topical pieces, generally solicited rather than submitted. There are generally 1 or 2 per issue, and because they are more of a commentary on current events than a full research project, they are generally about 4,000 words in length. They do not include abstracts or bibliographies, so use footnotes for references. Images may be included upon review of the editorial office.
Sample Article: "Thai Politics as Reality TV" by Duncan McCargo (68.01)

Trends and Reflections: These two types of pieces are longer than Asia Beyond the Headlines pieces but generally a bit shorter than articles. Most of the time the editorial office solicits these pieces, but occasionally an author of an unsolicited submission will be asked to rework their piece to fit into one of these genres. Trends pieces sometimes arise from exceptionally well-written Book Review Essays that we ask the author to expand, and sometimes are in response to a current topic in academia that is generating much debate. Reflections pieces usually focus on a particular figure or scholar who has made important contributions to Asian Studies. Pieces in this genre follow the same formatting as articles with included abstracts and author/date citations.
Trends Sample Article: "Nationalism, Modernity, and the 'Woman Question' in India and China" by Sanjay Seth (72.02)

Reflections Sample Article: "Peter Hessler: Teacher, Archaeologist, Anthropologist, Travel Writer, Master Storyteller" by Paul A. Cohen (72.02)

 

Book Review Essays and Book Reviews: There are occasional book review essays and 45 or more book reviews each issue. These are exclusively solicited by our Book Review Editors. Author name, affiliation and email address appear at the end of the review, with citations included in footnotes.
 

Contact Information: Books for Review

All books for review must be sent to the AAS Office.

DO NOT send books to the JAS Editorial Office:

Association for Asian Studies
ATTN: JAS Book Reviews
825 Victors Way, Suite 310
Ann Arbor, MI 48108 USA

We shall forward your book on to the appropriate book review editor.

Please direct correspondence regarding books and book reviews to jasoffice@journalofasianstudies.org or by phone: (949) 824-6521.

PLEASE NOTE: The Journal of Asian Studies does not accept unsolicited book reviews.

If you are interested in reviewing books selected by a Book Review Editor, please contact jasoffice@journalofasianstudies.org

English Language Editing Services. Authors, particularly those whose first language is not English, may wish to have their English-language manuscripts checked by a native speaker before submission. This is optional, but may help to ensure that the academic content of the paper is fully understood by the editor and any reviewers. We list a number of third-party services specializing in language editor and/or translation, and suggest that authors contact as appropriate. Click here for more information.

 

The One Over Rule & Other Thoughts on Submitting to The Journal of Asian Studies
Jeffrey Wasserstrom 

Editing the JAS is an exciting job but also a daunting job. It is exciting because so many fascinating pieces get sent in for consideration, but it is daunting because so few of these can be published. There is no magic formula used to determine which 25 or so of the well over 300 submissions we get in any given year end up being accepted, but over the course of my four years as Editor, I have come up with some rules of thumb. Since the Journal’s Managing Editor Jennifer Munger and I are often asked questions by authors trying to assess their chances of having their article accepted, it seems worth spelling out some of these: 

1) There are more pieces that qualify as the very best articles on Asia than we have room to publish. Our goal, therefore, is to select articles that are of very high quality and that, when taken together, make for individual issues and yearly volumes that seem likely to strike our readers as interesting and attractively varied. 

2) The One Over Rule. In an ideal world, every JAS article would be accessible and appealing to all members of the Association for Asian Studies, the group that remains our primary target readership. More realistically, I am determined that nothing run under my watch will only be of interest to scholars working in a single discipline and on a single period or locale, and that nothing will only make sense to a small segment of the AAS membership, due to the terminology or formulae used. A lot of excellent articles are highly specialized and intended simply for others who are expert in an area, but there are many good journals where such work can be published. The JAS, by contrast, is an interdisciplinary general journal. To work for us, an article has to, at the very least, be something that scholars in two or three different disciplines will be able to understand easily and that will have the potential at least to interest readers working on neighboring countries, related topics, and on adjacent periods. Articles do not need to be comparative or interdisciplinary. They do need to have a broad as opposed to narrow aspect to them. Hence, the “one over rule,” which means an ability to speak to someone in a field close to the author’s own. An article by, say, an anthropologist working on Laos need not have any obvious appeal to a literary critic specializing in the study of Korea, but if this piece would have no chance of drawing the interest of a sociologist whose focus is Cambodia, we have a problem. Similarly, while that imagined Korean literature specialist does not have to write a piece that is certain to draw in an economist primarily concerned with India, there’s a problem if Japanese studies scholars working in cultural studies do not think it speaks in any way to them. The same kind of thinking applies to periods as to places and disciplines.

 

Last updated: 07 August 2012