Psychological Medicine



Original Article

Puberty moderates genetic influences on disordered eating


KELLY L. KLUMP a1c1, PATRICK S. PERKINS a2, S. ALEXANDRA BURT a1, MATT McGUE a3 and WILLIAM G. IACONO a3
a1 Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
a2 Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA
a3 Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA

Article author query
klump kl   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
perkins ps   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
alexandra burt s   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mcgue m   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
iacono wg   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

Background. Previous research suggests that genetic influences on disordered eating may be greater in pubertal than pre-pubertal girls. Although these findings are consistent with pubertal activation of genetic influences on disordered eating, earlier studies were unable to directly test this hypothesis. The purpose of the present study therefore was to directly examine this possibility by investigating whether pubertal development moderates genetic influences on disordered eating.

Method. Participants were 510 female adolescent twins from the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Disordered eating was measured with the Total Score of the Minnesota Eating Behavior Survey, while pubertal status was assessed with the Pubertal Development Scale.

Results. Consistent with our hypothesis, model-fitting indicated significant increases in genetic influence on disordered eating with advancing pubertal development.

Conclusions. These findings suggest that puberty influences the expression of genes for disordered eating.

(Published Online March 5 2007)


Correspondence:
c1 Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, 107B Psychology Building, East Lansing, MI 48824-1116, USA. (Email: klump@msu.edu)


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