Primary Health Care Research & Development

Research

Weight loss surgery for non-morbidly obese populations with type 2 diabetes: is this an acceptable option for patients?

Rachael H. Summersa1 c1, Helen Elseya2, Michael Moorea3, Christopher Byrnea4a5, James Byrnea6, Richard Welbourna7 and Paul Rodericka8

a1 Health Services Research Fellow, Primary Care and Population Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

a2 Public Health Speciality Registrar, Academic Unit of Public Health, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

a3 Reader & Academic Lead Primary Care Research Network South West, Primary Care and Population Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

a4 Professor Endocrinology & Metabolism, Nutrition and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

a5 Southampton National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, UK

a6 Consultant Surgeon, General Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK

a7 Consultant Surgeon, Department of Bariatric Surgery, Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton, UK

a8 Professor of Public Health, Primary Care and Population Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

Abstract

Aim To explore the views of non-morbidly obese people (BMI 30–40 kg/m2) with type 2 diabetes regarding: (a) the acceptability of bariatric surgery (BS) as a treatment for type 2 diabetes, and (b) willingness to participate in randomised controlled trials comparing BS versus non-surgical intervention.

Background Despite weight management being a key therapeutic goal in type 2 diabetes, achieving and sustaining weight loss is problematic. BS is an effective treatment for people with morbid obesity and type 2 diabetes; it is less certain whether non-morbidly obese patients (BMI 30–39.9 kg/m2) with type 2 diabetes benefit from this treatment and whether this approach would be cost-effective. Before evaluating this issue by randomised trials, it is important to understand whether BS and such research are acceptable to this population.

Methods Non-morbidly obese people with type 2 diabetes were purposively sampled from primary care and invited to participate in semi-structured interviews. Interviews explored participants’ thoughts surrounding their diabetes and weight, the acceptability of BS and the willingness to participate in BS research. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis.

(Received July 24 2012)

(Revised April 21 2013)

(Accepted April 28 2013)

(Online publication June 05 2013)

Key words

  • bariatric surgery;
  • obesity;
  • qualitative research;
  • type 2 diabetes

Correspondence

c1 Correspondence to: Rachael H. Summers, Mail point 805, South Academic Block, C Floor, University of Southampton, Southampton University Hospital Trust, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. Email: R.Summers@soton.ac.uk

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