RNA

  • RNA / Volume 7 / Issue 12 / December 2001, pp 1717-1727
  • Copyright © 2001 RNA Society
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/ (About DOI), Published online: 11 January 2002


The DEAD box helicase, Dhh1p, functions in mRNA decapping and interacts with both the decapping and deadenylase complexes


JEFFERY M.  COLLER a1c1, MORGAN  TUCKER a1, UJWAL  SHETH a1, MARCO A.  VALENCIA-SANCHEZ a1 and ROY  PARKER a1
a1 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA

Abstract

A major pathway of mRNA turnover in eukaryotic cells initiates with deadenylation, leading to mRNA decapping and subsequent 5′ to 3′ exonuclease digestion. We show that a highly conserved member of the DEAD box family of helicases, Dhh1p, stimulates mRNA decapping in yeast. In dhh1[Delta] mutants, mRNAs accumulate as deadenylated, capped species. Dhh1p's effects on decapping only occur on normal messages as nonsense-mediated decay still occurs in dhh1[Delta] mutants. The role of Dhh1p in decapping appears to be direct, as Dhh1p physically interacts with several proteins involved in mRNA decapping including the decapping enzyme Dcp1p, as well as Lsm1p and Pat1p/Mrt1p, which function to enhance the decapping rate. Additional observations suggest Dhh1p functions to coordinate distinct steps in mRNA function and decay. Dhh1p also associates with Pop2p, a subunit of the mRNA deadenylase. In addition, genetic phenotypes suggest that Dhh1p also has a second biological function. Interestingly, Dhh1p homologs in others species function in maternal mRNA storage. This provides a novel link between the mechanisms of decapping and maternal mRNA translational repression.

(Received June 18 2001)
(Revised July 18 2001)
(Accepted August 20 2001)


Key Words: deadenylase; decapping; helicase; mRNA turnover.

Correspondence:
c1 Reprint requests to: Jeffery M. Coller, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; e-mail: jmcoller@email.arizona.edu.