Epidemiology and Infection

Original Papers

Influenza/vaccine

Parental risk perception and influenza vaccination of children in daycare centres

T. N. OFFUTT-POWELLa1 c1, R. P. OJHAa2, R. QUALLS-HAMPTONa3, S. STONECIPHERa4, K. P. SINGHa5 and K. M. CARDARELLIa3a6

a1 Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

a2 Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA

a3 Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA

a4 Zoonosis Control Division, Health Service Region 2/3, Texas Department of State Health Services, Arlington, TX, USA

a5 Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL, USA

a6 Center for Community Health, Texas Prevention Institute, Fort Worth, TX, USA

SUMMARY

Little information is available about perceptions of influenza vaccination of parents with healthy children in daycare. Therefore, we systematically explored the relationship between parental risk perception and influenza vaccination in children attending daycare. We distributed a self-administered paper survey to parents of children aged 6–59 months attending licensed daycare centres in Tarrant County, Texas. We used conditional logistic regression with penalized conditional likelihood to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% profile likelihood confidence limits (PL) for parental risk-perception factors and influenza vaccination. A high level of parental prevention behaviours (OR 9·1, 95% PL 3·2, 31) and physician recommendation (OR 8·2, 95% PL 2·7, 30) had the highest magnitudes of association with influenza vaccination of healthy children in daycare. Our results provide evidence about critical determinants of influenza vaccination of healthy children in daycare, which could help inform public health interventions aimed at increasing influenza vaccination coverage in this population.

(Received September 23 2012)

(Revised February 27 2013)

(Accepted March 06 2013)

(Online publication April 18 2013)

Key words

  • Epidemiology;
  • influenza;
  • paediatrics;
  • public health;
  • vaccination (immunization)

Correspondence

c1 Author for correspondence: T. N. Offutt-Powell, DrPH, MPH, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, 135 Dauer Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. (Email: topowell@email.unc.edu)

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