British Journal of Nutrition

Full Papers

Nutritional Endocrinology

Effect of vitamin D administration in vitamin D-deficient pregnant women on maternal and neonatal serum calcium and vitamin D concentrations: a randomised clinical trial

Sima Hashemipoura1, Fatemeh Laloohaa2 c1, Shabnam Zahir Mirdamadia3, Amir Ziaeea1 and Talaat Dabaghi Ghaleha2

a1 Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Science, Qazvin, Iran

a2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Science, Qazvin, Iran

a3 Kowsar Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Science, Qazvin, Iran

Abstract

There are several studies in which a correlation between maternal vitamin D deficiency and serum mineral disorders in the mother and the newborn has been reported. The present randomised clinical trial was designed to investigate the effect of vitamin D administration on maternal and fetal Ca and vitamin D status. The trial was carried out on 160 pregnant women. Vitamin D-deficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) < 30 ng/ml) pregnant women were recruited at 26–28 weeks of pregnancy. In the control group, a multivitamin supplement containing 400 IU vitamin D3/d was given. Patients in the treatment group were treated with 50 000 IU vitamin D3 weekly for a total duration of 8 weeks. At delivery, maternal and fetal Ca and 25(OH)D levels in both groups were compared. In total, 81 % of pregnant women were vitamin D deficient. At the time of delivery, Ca and vitamin D levels were higher in the treatment group compared with the control group (92 (sd 3) v. 85 (sd 4) mg/l, respectively, P= 0·001 for serum Ca; 47·8 (sd 11·1) v. 15·9 (sd 6·6) ng/ml, respectively, P< 0·001 for vitamin D). At the time of delivery, 32·7 % of women in the control group had hypocalcaemia, while no hypocalcaemic case was detected in the vitamin D-treated group. Mean neonatal serum 25(OH)D was higher in the treatment group compared with the control group (27·7 (sd 5·2) v.10·9 (sd 4·4) ng/ml, respectively, P< 0·01). The neonatal Ca level in the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group (99 (sd 3) v. 91 (sd 3) mg/l, respectively, P< 0·001). The administration of vitamin D to pregnant women with vitamin D deficiency improves both maternal and neonatal Ca levels.

(Received October 09 2012)

(Revised March 14 2013)

(Accepted March 18 2013)

(Online publication April 29 2013)

Key Words:

  • Vitamin D deficiency;
  • Pregnancy;
  • Hypocalcaemia

Correspondence

c1 Corresponding author: Dr F. Lalooha, fax +98 281 3326033, email mdrc46@yahoo.com

Footnotes

  Abbreviations: 25(OH)D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D

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