Epidemiology and Infection



Secular trends in incidence and antimicrobial resistance among clinical isolates of salmonella at a university hospital in Taiwan, 1983–1999


L. H.  SU  a1, C. H.  CHIU  a2, A. J.  KUO  a1, J. H.  CHIA  a1, C. F.  SUN  a1, H. S.  LEU  a3 and T. L.  WU  a1 c1
a1 Department of Clinical Pathology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan
a3 Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan
a2 Division of Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Paediatrics, Chang Gung Children's Hospital, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan

Abstract

The incidence and antimicrobial resistance among clinical isolates of salmonella at a university hospital in Taiwan between 1983 and 1999 are summarized in this report. A total of 7986 isolates were analysed. Serogroup B has been the most prevalent over the years, with an apparently continuous decline after 1995. Concordant decrease was also found among S. choleraesuis and S. typhi isolates in recent years. In contrast, the proportion of serogroup D strains increased significantly after 1996. S. typhi remained relatively susceptible to most of the antimicrobial agents examined. For non-typhoidal isolates, antimicrobial resistance to ampicillin (62%), chloramphenicol (67%), and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (37%) was relatively higher than that reported elsewhere. Newer generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones remained effective over the years, although emerging resistance to these drugs has been noticed since 1992. A more prudent selection and use of antimicrobial agents, in both humans and animals, and a continuous surveillance of resistance are essential in the future.

(Accepted April 23 2001)


Correspondence:
c1 Author for correspondence: Tsu-Lan Wu, Department of Clinical Pathology, Lin-Kou Medical Centre, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, No. 5, Fu-Hsing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan.


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