Parasitology

Research Article

Echinococcus species from red foxes, corsac foxes, and wolves in Mongolia

AKIRA ITOa1 c1 , GANTIGMAA CHULUUNBAATARa1a2 , TETSUYA YANAGIDAa1, ANU DAVAASURENa1a3, BATTULGA SUMIYAa2, MITSUHIKO ASAKAWAa4, TOSHIAKI KIa4, KAZUHIRO NAKAYAa5, ABMED DAVAAJAVa3, TEMUULEN DORJSURENa1a6, MINORU NAKAOa1 and YASUHITO SAKOa1

a1 Department of Parasitology, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan

a2 Laboratory of Entomology, Mongolian Academy of Science, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

a3 Department of Parasitology, National Center for Communicable Diseases, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

a4 Department of Parasitology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan

a5 Animal Laboratory for Medical Research, Center for Advanced Research and Education, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan

a6 Department of Medical Biology, School of Biomedicine, Health Science University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

SUMMARY

The small intestines of 420 wild canids (111 corsac foxes, 191 red foxes and 118 wolves) from Mongolia, were examined for adult worms of the genus Echinococcus. The Mongolian genotype of Echinococcus multilocularis was found in fifteen red foxes and four wolves, whereas two genotypes (G6/7 and G10) of Echinococcus canadensis were found in two and three wolves, respectively. No adult Echinococcus worms were found in the corsac foxes examined. The genotypes of E. multilocularis and E. canadensis are discussed in terms of host specificity and distribution in Mongolia. The importance of wolves in the completion of the life cycle of Echinococcus spp. is also discussed.

(Received April 14 2013)

(Revised May 07 2013)

(Revised May 28 2013)

(Accepted June 01 2013)

(Online publication August 19 2013)

Key words

  • Echinococcus multilocularis ;
  • Echinococcus canadensis ;
  • Asian and Mongolian genotypes G6/7 and G10;
  • red fox;
  • corsac fox;
  • wolf;
  • Mongolia

Correspondence

c1 Corresponding author. Department of Parasitology, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido 078-8510, Japan. Tel.: +81 166 68 2686. Fax: +81 166 68 2429. E-mail: akiraito@asahikawa-med.ac.jp

Footnotes

  These authors contributed equally for preparation of the manuscript.

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