Public Health Nutrition

Monitoring and surveillance

Consumption of soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages by 2-year-olds: findings from a population-based survey

Bernice Raveche Garnetta1 c1, Kenneth D Rosenberga2a3 and Daniel S Morrisa4

a1 Department of Society, Human Development and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Kresge Building, 7th Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA

a2 Office of Family Health, Oregon Public Health Division, Portland, OR, USA

a3 Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA

a4 Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, Oregon Public Health Division, Portland, OR, USA

Abstract

Objective To determine risk factors for consumption of soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) among 2-year-old children.

Design The analysis was performed using three linked data sets: the 2004–2005 Oregon Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring Survey (PRAMS); its longitudinal follow-up, 2006–2007 Oregon PRAMS-2; and 2004–2005 Oregon birth certificates.

Setting PRAMS is a surveillance programme supported by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and implemented by participating state health departments. Using mixed methods, PRAMS surveys women 2–6 months after a live birth. Oregon PRAMS-2 re-interviews respondents shortly after the index child's second birthday. Oregon PRAMS oversamples minority women.

Subjects Using monthly cohorts, we randomly selected 5851 women from the 2004–2005 birth certificates. In total 1911 women completed both PRAMS and PRAMS-2. The weighted response rate of PRAMS-2 was 43·5 %.

Results Almost half of mothers (49·9 %) reported that their child drank SSB on at least 1 d/week. Mothers whose children drank SSB at least once weekly were more likely to have low income (adjusted OR = 2·83, 95 % CI 2·09, 3·83) and to eat out on ≥2 d/week (OR = 2·11 %, 95 % CI 1·66, 2·70). Hispanic and non-Hispanic black women were most likely to report that their child drank SSB at least once weekly.

Conclusions Half of mothers reported that their 2-year-old children drank SSB at least once weekly. Public health interventions and policies should address childhood SSB consumption including educating health-care providers and parents.

(Received January 31 2012)

(Revised August 19 2012)

(Accepted August 21 2012)

(Online publication October 04 2012)

Keywords

  • Soda;
  • Sugar-sweetened beverages;
  • Child;
  • PRAMS;
  • Oregon

Correspondence

c1 Corresponding author: Email braveche@hsph.harvard.edu

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