British Journal of Nutrition

Full Papers

Dietary Surveys and Nutritional Epidemiology

Dietary patterns on weekdays and weekend days in 4–14-year-old Danish children

Berit W. Rothausena1 c1, Jeppe Matthiessena1, Lene F. Andersena2, Per B. Brockhoffa3 and Inge Tetensa1

a1 Division of Nutrition, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark

a2 Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PB 1046, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway

a3 Department of Informatics and Mathematical Modeling, Technical University of Denmark, Richard Petersens Plads, Building 321, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark

Abstract

Little is known about dietary patterns on weekdays and weekend days in children, and the aim of the present study was to investigate 4–14-year-old children's dietary patterns specifically on weekdays (Monday–Thursday) and weekend days (Saturday–Sunday). Dietary data were derived from the Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity 2003–8, where a total of 784 children aged 4–14 years completed a 7 d pre-coded food record. Principal component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns in the age groups 4–6, 7–10 and 11–14 years. Consistently, two dietary patterns, labelled ‘processed’ and ‘health conscious’, emerged on both weekdays and weekend days. Factor scores from corresponding dietary patterns were significantly correlated between weekdays and weekend days with the exception of the ‘health conscious’ pattern in the 7–10-year-olds. Within each age group, children with high agreement for the ‘processed’ pattern had a significantly higher dietary energy density, which was reflected in significantly higher intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages and lower intakes of fruit and vegetables, compared with children with high agreement for the ‘health conscious’ pattern (P< 0·05). Moreover, these variables indicated less healthy dietary intakes on weekend days than on weekdays for both patterns. In conclusion, two distinct dietary patterns, labelled ‘processed’ and ‘health conscious’, were identified on both weekdays and weekend days for each age group. While overall major dietary patterns may somewhat track between weekdays and weekends, the specific foods actually eaten became less healthy during weekends.

(Received January 30 2012)

(Revised July 17 2012)

(Accepted July 17 2012)

(Online publication September 10 2012)

Key Words:

  • Dietary assessments;
  • Principal component analysis;
  • Energy density

Correspondence

c1 Corresponding author: B. W. Rothausen, fax +45 3588 7119, email bewro@food.dtu.dk

Footnotes

  Abbreviations: High HCP, children with factor scores in the highest tertile for the ‘health conscious’ pattern and in the lowest or intermediate tertiles for the ‘processed’ pattern; High PP, children with factor scores in the highest tertile for the ‘processed’ pattern and in the lowest or intermediate tertiles for the ‘health conscious’ pattern; PCA, principal component analysis; SSB, sugar-sweetened beverages

0Comments