Applied Psycholinguistics

Articles

Spoken word recognition in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders and specific language impairment

TOM LOUCASa1 c1, NICK RICHESa1, GILLIAN BAIRDa2, ANDREW PICKLESa3, EMILY SIMONOFFa3, SUSIE CHANDLERa4 and TONY CHARMANa4

a1 University of Reading

a2 Guy's Hospital, London

a3 De Crespigny Park, London

a4 Institute of Education, London

ABSTRACT

Spoken word recognition, during gating, appears intact in specific language impairment (SLI). This study used gating to investigate the process in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders plus language impairment (ALI). Adolescents with ALI, SLI, and typical language development (TLD), matched on nonverbal IQ listened to gated words that varied in frequency (low/high) and number of phonological onset neighbors (low/high density). Adolescents with ALI required more speech input to initially identify low-frequency words with low competitor density than those with SLI and those with TLD, who did not differ. These differences may be due to less well specified word form representations in ALI.

(Received March 12 2010)

(Accepted April 21 2011)

Correspondence

c1 ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE Tom Loucas, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, Earley Gate, Reading RG6 6AL, United Kingdom. E-mail: t.loucas@reading.ac.uk

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