Journal of Pension Economics and Finance

Articles

Intrinsic work motivation and pension reform preferences

FRIEDRICH HEINEMANNa1 c1, TANJA HENNIGHAUSENa2 and MARC-DANIEL MOESSINGERa3

a1 ZEW Mannheim and University of Heidelberg (e-mail: Heinemann@zew.de)

a2 ZEW Mannheim and University of Mannheim

a3 ZEW Mannheim

Abstract

Although demographic change leaves pay-as-you-go pension systems unsustainable, reforms, such as a higher pension age, are highly unpopular. This contribution looks into the role of intrinsic motivation as a driver for pension reform preferences. Theoretical reasoning suggests that this driver should be relevant as it decreases the subjective costs of a higher pension age. We test this key hypothesis on the basis of the German General Social Survey (ALLBUS). The results are unambiguous: in addition to factors such as age or education, the inclusion of intrinsic work motivation helps improving our prediction of an individual's reform orientation.

(Online publication October 11 2012)

JEL CODES:

  • D78;
  • H55;
  • H31

Keywords:

  • Pension system;
  • reforms;
  • pension age;
  • ALLBUS;
  • intrinsic motivation

Correspondence

c1 Corresponding author: Friedrich Heinemann Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW) L7,1 68161 Mannheim, Germany. Tel: +49-621-1235 149.