British Journal of Nutrition

Full Papers

Behaviour, Appetite and Obesity

Weight change before and after the introduction of solids: results from a longitudinal birth cohort

Lenie van Rossema1a2a3 c1, Jessica C. Kiefte-de Jonga1a4, Caspar W. N. Loomana2, Vincent W. V. Jaddoea1a4a5, Albert Hofmana5, Anita C. S. Hokken-Koelegaa6, Johan P. Mackenbacha2, Henriëtte A. Molla4 and Hein Raata2

a1 The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands

a2 Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands

a3 Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands

a4 Department of Paediatrics, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands

a5 Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands

a6 Department of Paediatrics, Division of Endocrinology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Abstract

We studied the association, and its direction, between the introduction of solids and weight-for-height (WFH) change between birth and 45 months. Pregnant women were asked to participate in a birth cohort during their first antenatal visit. Data from 3184 children were used. The timing of the introduction of solids was reported by the mother from a questionnaire at 12 months postpartum, and categorised into very early (0–3 months), early (3–6 months) and timely (after 6 months) introduction of solids. Anthropometric data were collected during standardised child health centre visits. WFH was converted into a z-score. Repeated-measurements analyses with splines positioned according to the moments of solid introduction were used to obtain estimates for WFH change before and after the introduction of solids. Analyses were adjusted for educational level, ethnicity, smoking during pregnancy, mother's BMI, breast-feeding, history of food allergy and infant's hospital admission. Before solids were introduced, weight gain was higher in children introduced to solids early (z= 0·65, 95 % CI 0·34, 0·95) than in children introduced to solids very early (z= 0·02, 95 % CI − 0·03, 0·08) and timely (z= − 0·04, 95 % CI − 0·05, − 0·03). Shortly after the introduction of solids, children introduced to solids very early and early showed a relative decrease in WFH. WFH change did not differ between the solid introduction groups after 12 months, and at that time, weight change was as expected (i.e. z= 0). We therefore conclude that differences in WFH in childhood are not the result of early introduction to solids.

(Received August 22 2011)

(Revised February 15 2012)

(Accepted February 19 2012)

(Online publication April 05 2012)

Key Words:

  • Infant feeding;
  • Solids;
  • Weight change;
  • Longitudinal studies;
  • Epidemiology

Correspondence:

c1 Corresponding author: Dr L. van Rossem, fax +31 10 7044645, email l.vanrossem@umcutrecht.nl

Footnotes

  Abbreviations: WFH, weight-for-height

0Comments