Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Open Peer Commentary

The politics of moving beyond prejudice

Caroline Howartha1, Wolfgang Wagnera2a3, Shose Kessia4 and Ragini Sena5

a1 Institute of Social Psychology, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, WC2A 2AE, United Kingdom. c.s.howarth@lse.ac.uk http://www2.lse.ac.uk/socialPsychology/faculty/caroline_howarth/Home.aspx

a2 Institute of Education and Psychology, Johannes Kepler University, 4040 Linz, Austria. w.wagner@jku.at http://www.swp.jku.at/team/wagner

a3 Dept de Psicología Social, University of the Basque Country, San Sebastián, Spain. w.wagner@jku.at http://www.swp.jku.at/team/wagner

a4 Department of Psychology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7701, South Africa. shose.kessi@uct.ac.za

a5 Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, India, 110021. raginisen2011@gmail.com

Abstract

Dixon et al. have highlighted the importance of a political conceptualisation of intergroup relations that challenges individualising models of social change. As important as this paper is for the development of critical debates in psychology, we can detect at least three issues that warrant further discussion: (a) the cultural and historical conditions of structural inequality and its perception, (b) the marginalisation of post-colonial works on collective mobilisation, and (c) acknowledging the complex perspectives and politics of those targeted by prejudice.

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Beyond prejudice: Are negative evaluations the problem and is getting us to like one another more the solution? John Dixon Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 35, 6, 411. DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X11002214
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