The Cambridge Classical Journal

HORACE, ODES 3.27: A NEW WORLD FOR GALATEA

Elizabeth Mitchell 

Harvard University, USA

Abstract

Horace, Odes 3.27 consists of two relatively distinct parts: a long farewell to a woman named Galatea, and an even longer retelling of the myth of Europa. Europa's story is staged as an analogy to Galatea's situation (v. 25 sic et Europe…) but the apparently awkward comparison has long failed to satisfy readers. This paper reconsiders the poem in the light of a recent development in imperial geography, the transformation of Galatia in Asia Minor into a vast new Roman province in 25 BCE, and examines some of the implications of the proposed affinity between Galatea and Galatia.

Correspondence

Email: mitchell.lizzy@googlemail.com.

Footnotes

  I owe a great many thanks to John Henderson for his wit, patience and immense generosity with ideas during the writing of this paper, and to Sarah Monks for sharing with me a rich new seam of work on Benjamin West. I am also grateful to Tom Zanker and John Mitchell, who read through and commented on the text, and to Richard Thomas, who advised on the early Horatian commentators.