Epidemiology and Infection

  • Epidemiology and Infection / Volume 140 / Issue 10 / October 2012, pp 1830-1837
  • Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011 The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268811002317 (About DOI), Published online: 29 November 2011
  • OPEN ACCESS

Hepatitis

Improved hepatitis C treatment response in younger patients: findings from the UK HCV National Register cohort study

H. E. HARRISa1 c1, A. COSTELLAa1, G. AMIRTHALINGAMa1, G. ALEXANDERa2, M. E. B. RAMSAYa1, N. ANDREWSa3 and the UK HCV National Register Collaborators on behalf of the UK HCV National Register Steering Group

a1 Immunisation, Hepatitis and Blood Safety Department, Health Protection Services Colindale, Health Protection Agency, London, UK

a2 Department of Medicine, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK

a3 Statistics, Modelling and Bioinformatics Department, Health Protection Services Colindale, Health Protection Agency, London, UK

SUMMARY

In a cohort of 272 treatment-naive individuals with chronic hepatitis C infection acquired on a known date who were enrolled in the UK HCV National Register, a progressive improvement in response to treatment was found with the evolution of antiviral therapies from 20% (25/122) for interferon monotherapy to 63% (55/88) for pegylated interferon+ribavirin therapy. Multivariable analysis results showed increasing age to be associated with poorer response to therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0·84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·72–0·99, P=0·03] whereas time since infection was not associated with response (OR 0·93, 95% CI 0·44–1·98, P=0·85). Other factors significantly associated with a positive response were non-type 1 genotype (P<0·0001) and combination therapies (P<0·0001). During the first two decades of chronic HCV infection, treatment at a younger age was found to be more influential in achieving a sustained viral response than treating earlier in the course of infection.

(Accepted October 26 2011)

(Online publication November 29 2011)

Correspondence:

c1 Author for correspondence: Dr H. E. Harris, Clinical Scientist – Epidemiology. Immunisation, Hepatitis and Blood Safety Department, Health Protection Services Colindale, Health Protection Agency, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, UK. (Email: helen.harris@hpa.org.uk)

Footnotes

† The UK HCV National Register Collaborators (Appendix 1) and the UK HCV National Register Steering Group (Appendix 2) are available online.

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