Epidemiology and Infection

  • Epidemiology and Infection / Volume 140 / Issue 08 / August 2012, pp 1343-1355
  • Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268812000957 (About DOI), Published online: 14 May 2012
  • OPEN ACCESS

Bacterial meningitis

Dose-specific efficacy of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines: a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials

U. K. GRIFFITHSa1 c1, A. CLARKa2, B. GESSNERa3, A. MINERSa2, C. SANDERSONa2, E. R. SEDYANINGSIHa4 and K. E. MULHOLLANDa5

a1 Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK

a2 Department of Health Services Research and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK

a3 Agence de Medecine Preventive, Paris, France

a4 Ministry of Health, Indonesia

a5 Department of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK

SUMMARY

Global coverage of infant Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination has increased considerably during the past decade, partly due to GAVI Alliance donations of the vaccine to low-income countries. In settings where large numbers of children receive only one or two vaccine doses rather than the recommended three doses, dose-specific efficacy estimates are needed to predict impact. The objective of this meta-analysis is to determine Hib vaccine efficacy against different clinical outcomes after receiving one, two or three doses of vaccine. Studies were eligible for inclusion if a prospective, controlled design had been used to evaluate commercially available Hib conjugate vaccines. Eight studies were included. Pooled vaccine efficacies against invasive Hib disease after one, two or three doses of vaccine were 59%, 92% and 93%, respectively. The meta-analysis provides robust estimates for use in decision-analytical models designed to predict the impact of Hib vaccine.

(Received December 07 2011)

(Revised April 16 2012)

(Accepted April 16 2012)

(Online publication May 14 2012)

Correspondence:

c1 Author for correspondence: Dr U. K. Griffiths, Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 15–17 Tavistock Place, London WC1H 9SH, UK. (Email: ulla.griffiths@lshtm.ac.uk)

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