Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom

Research Article

Coral diseases in aquaria and in nature

Michael Sweeta1 c1, Rachel Jonesa2 and John Bythella1

a1 School of Biology, Ridley Building, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK

a2 Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY

Abstract

Many reef coral diseases have been described affecting corals in the wild, several of which have been associated with causal agents based on experimental inoculation and testing of Koch's postulates. In the aquarium industry, many coral diseases and pathologies are known from the grey literature but as yet these have not been systematically described and the relationship to known diseases in the wild is difficult to determine. There is therefore scope to aid the maintenance and husbandry of corals in aquaria by informing the field of the scientifically described wild diseases, if these can be reliably related. Conversely, since the main driver to identifying coral diseases in aquaria is to select an effective treatment, the lessons learnt by aquarists on which treatments work with particular syndromes provides invaluable evidence for determining the causal agents. Such treatments are not commonly sought by scientists working in the natural environment due the cost and potential environmental impacts of the treatments. Here we review both wild and aquarium diseases and attempt to relate the two. Many important aquarium diseases could not be reconciled to those in the wild. In one case, however, namely that of the ciliate Helicostoma sp. as a causal agent of brown jelly syndrome in aquarium corals, there may be similarities with pathogenic agents of the wild coral diseases, such as white syndrome and brown band syndrome. We propose that Helicostoma is actually a misnomer, but improved understanding of this pathogen and others could benefit both fields. Improved practices in aquarium maintenance and husbandry would also benefit natural environments by reducing the scale of wild harvest and improving the potential for coral culture, both for the aquarium industry and for rehabilitation programmes.

(Received January 07 2011)

(Accepted September 12 2011)

(Online publication November 01 2011)

Correspondence:

c1 Correspondence should be addressed to: M. Sweet, School of Biology, Ridley Building, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK email: m.j.sweet@newcastle.ac.uk