Environmental Practice

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ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEWS AND CASE STUDIES: New Strategies for Implementing Locally Integrated Stream Restoration Projects

Cheryl de Boera1 c1 and Hans Bressersa2

a1 B.Eng. & Mgmt., MEPP Researcher/PhD Candidate, CSTM–Twente Center for Technology and Sustainable Development, Institute for Innovation and Governance Studies, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands

a2 Professor of Policy Studies and Environmental Policy, CSTM–Twente Center for Technology and Sustainable Development, Institute for Innovation and Governance Studies, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands

Abstract

Flooding risks in the Netherlands have been a high priority for decades because of its high population density, proximity to the North Sea, and extensive use of land reclamation techniques. With confounding factors such as climate and land-use changes, the Dutch water boards, governments, nongovernment organizations (NGOs), local farmers, and private citizens are addressing the vulnerabilities related to increasing flood risks by improving the resilience of the natural and social systems. Based on an existing framework of important governance regime characteristics, we explore how local groups work toward a more sustainable situation by producing synergetic win-win situations, constructive and cooperative planning and implementation, and the development of a high level of trust.

Environmental Practice 14:26–34 (2012)

(Received April 18 2011)

(Revised July 01 2011)

(Accepted July 14 2011)

(Online publication March 20 2012)

Correspondence

c1 Cheryl de Boer, CSTM–Twente Center for Technology and Sustainable Development, Institute for Innovation and Governance Studies, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands; (phone) +31.53.4894553; (fax) +31.53.4894850; (e-mail) c.deboer@utwente.nl

Cheryl de Boer is a PhD/researcher at the CSTM–Twente Center for Studies in Technology and Sustainable Development at the University of Twente in Enschede, the Netherlands. Her research focuses on the different characteristics of regimes that enable local level stream restoration projects to be successful in contributing to a sustainable water resource. Cheryl served as the vice president of the Bay Area Restoration Council from 2008 to 2009, which is a nonprofit organization formed in 1991 and tasked with restoring and protecting Hamilton Harbour and its watershed as part of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. She holds a master's degree in Engineering and Public Policy from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. She has worked both as an engineer with Siemens Canada, as a research assistant on Transboundary Water Governance at McMaster University, and as a public servant dealing with storm-water management for the City of Hamilton.

Hans Bressers is Professor of Policy Studies and Environmental Policy at the University of Twente in Enschede, the Netherlands, and founder of the CSTM–Twente Center for Technology and Sustainable Development. He has published extensively on various aspects of environmental policy—mapping, instruments, implementation, evaluation of policy networks—mostly as applied to environmental policies and water management. He has been a researcher and project leader of numerous externally funded projects, including several projects funded through the European Union research framework. He was, inter alia, vice-chairman of the official permanent Evaluation Committee of the Environmental Management Act, which advises the Minister regularly on the efficacy of Dutch environmental policy. He has reviewed national research programs and chaired review committees of the Dutch national science foundation. Furthermore, he was a member of the editorial board of the Dutch policy studies journal Beleidswetenschap (Policy Science). Currently, he is an independent scientific member of the Commission on Sustainable Development of the Dutch Social-Economic Council (Sociaal-Economische Raad, SER).