Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology

Articles

Bystander Antiprejudice: Cross-Cultural Education, Links With Positivity Towards Cultural ‘Outgroups’ and Preparedness to Speak Out

Anne Pedersena1 c1, Yin Paradiesa2, Lisa Kathryn Hartleya3 and Kevin M. Dunna4

a1 Murdoch University, Australia. A.Pedersen@murdoch.edu.au

a2 University of Melbourne, Australia.

a3 Murdoch University, Australia.

a4 University of Western Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

This article describes a 12-week intervention targeting positivity towards asylum seekers, Indigenous Australians and Muslim Australians. The study also assessed change in the intention to engage in bystander activism in four different scenarios: two Indigenous (old-fashioned and modern prejudice), one Muslim and one asylum seeker. There was a significant increase in positivity towards asylum seekers, Indigenous Australians and Muslim Australians. There was also a significant increase in ‘speaking out intention’, a form of bystander anti-prejudice, in three of the scenarios, but not in response to the Indigenous old-fashioned prejudice scenario. The study indicates that structured education on cross-cultural issues can improve attitudes to perceived ‘outgroups’ and, for the most part, increase participants' intention to speak out against prejudice.

Key Words

  • prejudice;
  • racism;
  • asylum seeker;
  • Indigenous;
  • Muslim

Correspondence:

c1 Address for correspondence: Anne Pedersen, Psychology Department, Murdoch University, Murdoch WA 6150, Australia.