Twin Research and Human Genetics

Articles

Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in hsa-mir-196a-2 and Breast Cancer Risk: A Case Control Study

Dominik J. Jedlinskia1, Plamena N. Gabrovskaa2, Stephen R. Weinsteina3, Robert A. Smitha4 and Lyn R. Griffithsa5 c1

a1 Genomics Research Centre, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University Gold Coast, Southport, Australia; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Switzerland.

a2 Genomics Research Centre, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University Gold Coast, Southport, Australia.

a3 Department of Pathology, Gold Coast Hospital, Southport, Australia.

a4 Genomics Research Centre, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University Gold Coast, Southport, Australia.

a5 Genomics Research Centre, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University Gold Coast, Southport, Australia. l.griffiths@griffith.edu.au

Abstract

microRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that influence gene expression on a post-transcriptional level. They participate in diverse biological pathways and may act as either tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. As they may have an effect on thousands of target mRNAs, single-nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA genes might have major functional consequences, because the microRNA's properties and/or maturation may change. miR-196a has been reported to be aberrantly expressed in breast cancer tissue. Additionally, the SNP rs11614913 in hsa-mir-196a-2 has been found to be associated with breast cancer risk in some studies although not in others. This study evaluated the association between rs11614913 and breast cancer risk in a Caucasian case-control cohort in Queensland, Australia. Results do not support an association of the tested hsa-mir-196a-2 polymorphism with breast cancer susceptibility in this cohort. As there is a discrepancy between our results and previous findings, it is important to assess the role of rs11614913 in breast cancer by further larger studies investigating different ethnic groups.

(Received January 17 2011)

(Accepted June 29 2011)

Keywords

  • breast cancer;
  • micro-RNA;
  • cancer risk;
  • SNP;
  • rs11614913

Correspondence:

c1 ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE: Professor Lyn Griffiths, Genomics Research Centre, Griffith University Gold Coast Campus, Parklands Drive, Southport QLD 4215, Australia.

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