Twin Research and Human Genetics

Articles

CD36 Gene Promoter Polymorphisms Are Associated With Low Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol in Normal Twins and After a Low-Calorie Diet in Obese Subjects

Estibaliz Goyenecheaa1, Laura J. Collinsa2, Dolores Parraa3, Gaifen Liua4, Harold Sniedera5, Ramasamyiyer Swaminathana6, Tim D. Spectora7, J. Alfredo Martíneza8 and Sandra D. O'Della9 c1

a1 Department of Nutrition, Food Science, Physiology and Toxicology, University of Navarra, Spain.

a2 King's College London, Nutritional Sciences Division, United Kingdom.

a3 Department of Nutrition, Food Science, Physiology and Toxicology, University of Navarra, Spain.

a4 Unit of Genetic Epidemiology and Bioinformatics, Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, the Netherlands.

a5 Unit of Genetic Epidemiology and Bioinformatics, Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, the Netherlands; Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, King's College London, St Thomas' Hospital Campus, United Kingdom.

a6 Department of Clinical Chemistry, St Thomas' Hospital, King's College London, United Kingdom.

a7 Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, King's College London, St Thomas' Hospital Campus, United Kingdom.

a8 Department of Nutrition, Food Science, Physiology and Toxicology, University of Navarra, Spain.

a9 King's College London, Nutritional Sciences Division, United Kingdom. sandra.o'dell@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

Common polymorphisms of the CD36 fatty acid transporter gene have been associated with lipid metabolism and cardiovascular disease. Association of a CD36 promoter single nucleotide polymorphism genotype with anthropometry and serum lipids was investigated in normal subjects, and in obese subjects during an 8-week low calorie diet and 6-month weight-maintenance period. 2728 normal female Twins UK subjects (mean body mass index 24.8 ± 4.4 kg/m2; age 47.3 ± 12.5 y) and 183 obese male and female Spanish subjects (mean body mass index 30.6 ± 3.0 kg/m2; age 35.0 ± 5.0 y) were genotyped for the CD36-22674 T/C (rs2151916) promoter single nucleotide polymorphism. In the Twins UK full cohort, the C-allele was associated with lower low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (p = .02, N = 2396). No associations were found in the obese Spanish subjects at baseline, but 6 months after the end of the low-calorie diet, the C-allele was associated with lower total- (p = .03) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (p = .01) and higher high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (p = .01). Intake of saturated fatty acids was lower in carriers of the C-allele at baseline, but not significantly so (p = .11). However, 6 months after the end of the low-calorie diet, elements of the lipid profile were correlated with saturated fatty acid intake: total cholesterol r = .21, p = .060; low density lipoprotein-cholesterol: r = .25, p = .043; high density lipoprotein-cholesterol: r= –.26, p = .007. CD36 promoter SNP allele –22674C is therefore associated with lower serum low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in normal female twins and with improved lipid profile during weight loss and maintenance in obese subjects.

(Received August 28 2008)

(Accepted September 05 2008)

Keywords

  • CD36 promoter;
  • SNP association study;
  • LDL-cholesterol;
  • low calorie diet (LCD)

Correspondence:

c1 Address for correspondence: Dr Sandra O'Dell, Nutritional Sciences Division, King's College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, United Kingdom.

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