Twin Research and Human Genetics

Articles

Heritability of Oral Microbial Species in Caries-Active and Caries-Free Twins

Patricia M. Corbya1 c1, Walter A. Bretza2, Thomas C. Harta3, Nicholas J. Schorka4, J Wessela5, James Lyons-Weilera6 and Bruce J. Pastera7

a1 New York University College of Dentistry, New York, United States of America. patricia.corby@nyu.edu

a2 New York University College of Dentistry, New York, United States of America.

a3 NIDCR/NIH, Division of Intramural Clinical Research, Bethesda, United States of America.

a4 Scripps Genomic Medicine and The Scripps Research Institute and Center for Human Genetics and Genomics, University of California, San Diego, United States of America.

a5 Scripps Genomic Medicine and The Scripps Research Institute and Center for Human Genetics and Genomics, University of California, San Diego, United States of America.

a6 University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, United States of America.

a7 The Forsyth Institute, Boston, United States of America.

Abstract

Oral microbes that colonize in the mouths of humans contribute to disease susceptibility, but it is unclear if host genetic factors mediate colonization. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the levels at which oral microbes colonize in the mouth are heritable. Dental plaque biofilms were sampled from intact tooth surfaces of 118 caries-free twins. An additional 86 caries-active twins were sampled for plaque from carious lesions and intact tooth surfaces. Using a reverse capture checkerboard assay the relative abundance of 82 bacterial species was determined. An integrative computational predictive model determined microbial abundance patterns of microbial species in caries-free twins as compared to caries-active twins. Heritability estimates were calculated for the relative microbial abundance levels of the microbial species in both groups. The levels of 10 species were significantly different in healthy individuals than in caries-active individuals, including, A. defectiva, S. parasanguinis, S. mitis/oralis, S. sanguinis, S. cristatus, S. salivarius, Streptococcus sp. clone CH016, G. morbillorum and G. haemolysans. Moderate to high heritability estimates were found for these species (h2 = 56%–80%, p < .0001). Similarity of the overall oral microbial flora was also evident in caries-free twins from multivariate distance matrix regression analysis. It appears that genetic and/or familial factors significantly contribute to the colonization of oral beneficial species in twins.

(Received July 16 2007)

(Accepted August 29 2007)

Correspondence:

c1 Address for correspondence: Patricia M. A. Corby, New York University, College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010.

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