Epidemiology and Infection

  • Epidemiology and Infection / Volume 140 / Issue 02 / February 2012, pp 268-275
  • Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011 The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268811000549 (About DOI), Published online: 14 April 2011
  • OPEN ACCESS

Rota- and noroviruses

Norovirus genotypes in endemic acute gastroenteritis of infants and children in Finland between 1994 and 2007

L. PUUSTINENa1 c1, V. BLAZEVICa1, L. HUHTIa1, E. D. SZAKALa1, A. HALKOSALOa1, M. SALMINENa1 and T. VESIKARIa1a2

a1 Vaccine Research Center, University of Tampere Medical School, Tampere, Finland

a2 Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Finland

SUMMARY

Noroviruses are, after rotaviruses, the second most common causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in young children. We studied norovirus genotypes in faecal specimens collected from Finnish children followed-up prospectively in rotavirus vaccine trials. Almost 5000 faecal specimens collected from cases of acute gastroenteritis were examined using reverse transcriptase–PCR. A total of 1172 cases (25% of all acute gastroenteritis) were associated with noroviruses. Of these, 96% were genogroup GII. GII.4 was the most common genotype (46%) throughout the study period but the proportion of this genotype varied in different norovirus epidemic seasons. Additional norovirus genotypes detected were: GII.7 (15%), GII.3 (14%), GII.1 (9%), GII.b (7%), GII.2 (3%), and GI.3 (2%). GII.4 dominated during the following years: 1998–1999 (75%), 2002–2003 (88%) and 2006–2007 (98%) while recombinant genotype GII.b was dominant between 2003 and 2004 (83%). In conclusion, genotypes GII.4 and GIIb have emerged as predominant norovirus genotypes in endemic gastroenteritis affecting young infants and children in Finland.

(Accepted March 09 2011)

(Online publication April 14 2011)

Correspondence:

c1 Author for correspondence: L. Puustinen, M.Sc., University of Tampere Medical School, Vaccine Research Center, FM 3, Biokatu 10, FIN – 33520 Tampere, Finland. (Email: leena.puustinen@uta.fi)

Metrics