Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Open Peer Commentary

The unbearable lightness of “Thinking”: Moving beyond simple concepts of thinking, rationality, and hypothesis testing

Gary L. Brasea1 and James Shanteaua1

a1 Department of Psychology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506. gbrase@ksu.edu shanteau@ksu.edu http://www.k-state.edu/psych/research/brase_gary.htm http://www.k-state.edu/psych/research/shanteau_james.htm

Abstract

Three correctives can get researchers out of the trap of constructing unitary theories of “thinking”: (1) Strong inference methods largely avoid problems associated with universal prescriptive normativism; (2) theories must recognize that significant modularity of cognitive processes is antithetical to general accounts of thinking; and (3) consideration of the domain-specificity of rationality render many of the present article's issues moot.

(Online publication October 14 2011)

Related Articles

    Subtracting “ought” from “is”: Descriptivism versus normativism in the study of human thinking Shira Elqayam and Jonathan St. B. T. Evans Division of Psychology, School of Applied Social Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH, United Kingdom. selqayam@dmu.ac.uk http://www.psy.dmu.ac.uk/elqayam; School of Psychology, Faculty of Science, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, PL4 8AA, United Kingdom. jevans@plymouth.ac.uk http://www.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/jevans
    Metrics