Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics



BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOETHICS

The Bodily Incorporation of Mechanical Devices: Ethical and Religious Issues (Part 1)


COURTNEY S.  CAMPBELL  a1 , LAUREN A.  CLARK  a2 , DAVID  LOY  a3 , JAMES F.  KEENAN  a4 , KATHLEEN  MATTHEWS  a5 , TERRY  WINOGRAD  a6 and LAURIE  ZOLOTH  a7
a1 Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon
a2 Denison University, Granville, Ohio
a3 Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio
a4 Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, and Weston Jesuit School of Theology, Cambridge, Massachusetts
a5 Rice University, Houston, Texas
a6 Stanford University, Stanford, California
a7 Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

Article author query
campbell cs   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
clark la   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
loy d   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
keenan jf   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
matthews k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
winograd t   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
zoloth l   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

A substantial portion of the developed world's population is increasingly dependent on machines to make their way in the everyday world. For certain privileged groups, computers, cell phones, PDAs, Blackberries, and IPODs, all permitting the faster processing of information, are commonplace. In these populations, even exercise can be automated as persons try to achieve good physical fitness by riding stationary bikes, running on treadmills, and working out on cross-trainers that send information about performance and heart rate. a



Footnotes

a This essay is drawn from collaborative research conducted under the auspices of the “Altering Nature: How Religious Traditions Assess the New Biotechnologies” project at Rice University from 2002 to 2004 through the financial support of The Ford Foundation (Grant #1010-1601). The paper is submitted with the permission and acknowledgement of the project coordinators and The Ford Foundation. The authors also acknowledge the research and editorial assistance of Dr. Siobhan Baggot and Ms. Sarah Gehrke.



Metrics
0Comments