Business History Review

Essays

Global Perspectives on Modern Business

Louis Galambosa1

a1 Louis Galambos is professor of history and editor of The Papers of Dwight David Eisenhower at Johns Hopkins University.

The dominant paradigm in business history has for many years been the synthesis developed by Alfred D. Chandler, Jr. Like most paradigms that define a field of scholarship, Chandler's has attracted swarms of devotees and critics, and for some years, it was customary to perform a ritual bow toward his work in the first or second paragraph of any article appearing in the Business History Review. This was true whether the substance of the article appeared to support or contradict Chandlers concept of the development of modern private enterprise.

Louis Galambos is professor of history and editor of The Papers of Dwight David Eisenhower at Johns Hopkins University. Most of his work in recent years has focused on the process of innovation in large-scale, modern organizations, both public and private. His most recent articles include “The Innovative Organization: Viewed from the Shoulders of Schumpeter, Chandler, Lazonik, et al.,” Business and Economic History, Second Series, 21 (1993): 79–91; “The Authority and Responsibility of the Chief Executive Officer: Shifting Patterns in Large U.S. Enterprises in the Twentieth Century,” Industrial and Corporate Change 4, 1 (1995): 187–203; and Networks of Innovation: Vaccine Development at Merck, Sharp & Dohme, and Mulford, 1895–1995, with Jane Eliot Sewell (1995).