Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Open Peer Commentary

Choice blindness and the non-unitary nature of the human mind

Petter Johanssona1, Lars Halla2 and Peter Gärdenforsa2

a1 Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, United Kingdom. petter.johansson@lucs.lu.se http://www.lucs.lu.se/petter.johansson/

a2 Lund University Cognitive Science, Lund University, Sweden. lars.hall@lucs.lu.se http://www.lucs.lu.se/lars.hall/ peter.gardenfors@lucs.lu.se http://www.lucs.lu.se/peter.gardenfors

Abstract

Experiments on choice blindness support von Hippel & Trivers's (VH&T's) conception of the mind as fundamentally divided, but they also highlight a problem for VH&T's idea of non-conscious self-deception: If I try to trick you into believing that I have a certain preference, and the best way is to also trick myself, I might actually end up having that preference, at all levels of processing.

(Online publication February 03 2011)

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    The evolution and psychology of self-deception William von Hippel and Robert Trivers School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia. billvh@psy.uq.edu.au http://www.psy.uq.edu.au/directory/index.html?id=1159; Department of Anthropology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. trivers@rci.rutgers.edu http://anthro.rutgers.edu/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=102&Itemid=136
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