Journal of Materials Research

Articles

Pore geometry in woven fiber structures: 0°/90° plain-weave cloth layup preform

S-B. Leea1 p1, S. R. Stocka2, M. D. Buttsa3 p2, T. L. Starra4, T. M. Breuniga5 and J. H. Kinneya6

a1 Republic of Korea Army Headquarters, Chungnam, Nonsan, Duma Namson, Republic of Korea

a2 School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0245

a3 Chicago Bridge and Iron, Chicago, Illinois

a4 School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0245

a5 Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143–0758

a6 Chemistry and Materials Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550

Abstract

Composite preform fiber architectures range from the very simple to the complex, and the extremes are typified by parallel continuous fibers and complicated three-dimensional woven structures. Subsequent processing of these preforms to produce dense composites may depend critically on the geometry of the interfiber porosity. The goal of this study is to fully characterize the structure of a 0°/90° cloth layup preform using x-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM). This characterization includes the measurement of intercloth channel widths and their variability, the transverse distribution of through-cloth holes, and the distribution of preform porosity. The structure of the intercloth porosity depends critically on the magnitude and direction of the offset between adjacent cloth layers. The structures observed include two-dimensional networks of open pipes linking adjacent holes, arrays of parallel one-dimensional pipes linking holes, and relatively closed channels exhibiting little structure, and these different structures would appear to offer very different resistances to gas flow through the preform. These measurements, and future measurements for different fiber architectures, will yield improved understanding of the role of preform structure on processing.

(Received February 12 1996)

(Accepted January 02 1998)

Correspondence:

p1 Formerly at School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0245.

p2 Formerly at School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0245.

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