MRS Bulletin

Technical Feature

Technical Feature

Acoustic Metamaterials

Lee Fok, Muralidhar Ambati and Xiang Zhang

Abstract

The field of engineered materials with designed properties is expected to continue to grow in the future, and metamaterials are instrumental in allowing this freedom of design. Metamaterials, particularly acoustic, are still in the stage of infancy. Acoustic metamaterials are being explored theoretically, but there has been little headway on the experimental front. The design, development, and characterization of acoustic metamaterials will offer many opportunities in materials science. In this article, we review the basic physics of different kinds of acoustic periodic structures with special emphasis on locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. We first survey phononic crystals and then discuss localized resonances in intrinsic and inertial resonating structures of acoustic metamaterials. Finally, we present the ongoing efforts in realizing acoustic metamaterials with negative materials properties and discuss the implications of acoustic metamaterials.

Lee Fok can be reached at 248 Hesse Hall, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; tel. 510-643-4972, and e-mail leefok@berkeley.edu.

Fok is currently working toward his PhD degree in mechanical engineering at the University of California–Berkeley. He received his BS and MS degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Fok's research interests include acoustics and acoustic metamaterials. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship.

Muralidhar Ambati can be reached at 245 Hesse Hall, Department of Mecha nical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; tel. 510-643-4972, and e-mail murli@berkeley.edu.

Ambati is currently working toward his PhD degree in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California–Berkeley. He received his BTech and MS degrees from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and Texas A&M University, respectively. His research interests include metamaterials and plasmonics. Ambati is a member of the International Society for Optical Engineering, the American Physical Society, and the Materials Research Society. He is the recipient of the MRS Graduate Student Award (2008), as well as the Royce E. Wisen baker '39 Graduate Fellowship, and the Forsythe Graduate Fellowship at Texas A&M University.

Xiang Zhang can be reached at 5130 Etcheverry Hall, Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740, USA; tel. 510-642-0390, and e-mail xiang@berkeley.edu.

Zhang is currently a Chancellor's professor and the director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center at the University of California–Berkeley. He also is a professor in the program of Applied Science and Technology at UC–Berkeley. He received his BS and MS degrees in solid-state physics from Nanjing University, China, and his PhD degree in mechanical engineering from UC–Berkeley. Zhang served as chair of a session at the Metamaterials, Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference (2006). He also served as chair of the Technical Program at the IEEE 2nd International Conference on Micro and Nano Engineered and Molecular Systems. His research interests include plasmonics, metamateri als, nano-manufacturing, and nano-devices. Zhang is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award (1997) and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award (1999).

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