MRS Bulletin

Technical Feature

Technical Feature

Connecting Electrical and Molecular Properties of Semiconducting Polymers for Thin-Film Transistors

Michael L. Chabinyc, Leslie H. Jimison, Jonathan Rivnay and Alberto Salleo

Abstract

An overview of recent work on the connection between electrical and molecular properties of semiconducting polymers for thin-film transistors (TFTs) is presented. A description of the molecular packing and microstructure of amorphous to semicrystalline semiconducting polymers is presented. The features of basic models for electrical transport in TFTs are discussed. These studies indicate that defect states and traps are as important as ordered domains for understanding transport in semiconducting polymers. Advanced methods, such as electric force microscopy, useful for measuring the characteristics of defect states and charge traps, are briefly reviewed.

Michael L. Chabinyc can be reached at the Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050; tel. 805-893-4042, and e-mail mchabinyc@engineering.ucsb.edu. He is an associate professor at the University of California—Santa Barbara (UCSB) in the Materials Department. He received his BS degree from the University of Dayton (1994) and his PhD degree in chemistry from Stanford University (1999), and was a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University (2001). Chabinyc was a member of research staff in the Electronic Materials and Devices Laboratory at Palo Alto Research Center before moving to UCSB. He has worked in the areas of gas-phase chemistry, microfluidics, molecular electronics, and organic electronics. His current research focuses on semiconducting polymers for printed electronics.

Leslie H. Jimison can be reached at Stanford University, 476 Lomita Mall, McCullough Bldg., Room 213, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; tel. 650-723-6338, and e-mail ljimison@stanford.edu.

Jimison is in the materials science and engineering department at Stanford University, working under Alberto Salleo. She graduated from North Carolina State University with a BS degree in materials science where she worked under Jon Paul Maria and studied piezoelectric thin-film capacitors. Jimison's current research focuses on the correlation of microstructure and electronic properties of polymer semiconductors, particularly the role of grain boundaries in subbandgap trap state distributions. She is the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship.

Jonathan Rivnay can be reached at Stanford University, 476 Lomita Mall, McCullough Bldg., Room 213, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; tel. 650-723-6338, and e-mail rivnay@stanford.edu.

Rivnay is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He received his BS degree in materials science from Cornell University in 2006. Rivnay's research interests include structure transport relations and spectroscopy of organic semiconductors. He is the recipient of a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

Alberto Salleo can be reached at Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, McCullough Bldg., Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; tel. 650-725-1025, and e-mail asalleo@stanford.edu.

Salleo is an assistant professor in the materials science department at Stanford University. He received a Laurea degree in chemistry from the University of Rome in 1994 and a PhD degree in materials science from the University of California-Berkeley in 2001. Salleo then spent four years at the Palo Alto Research Center before joining the materials science department at Stanford University in 2005. His research is centered on large-area electronics. Salleo's interests are in charge transport and microstructure in polymeric semiconductors (for which he was granted a National Science Foundation CAREER Award), nanostructured transparent conductors, and laser processing of materials.

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