MRS Proceedings

Articles

Block Copolymer Templating for Formation of Quantum Dots and Lattice Mismatched Semiconductor Structures

2010 MRS Spring Meeting.

Smita Jhaa1, Chi-Chun Liua2, Joo Hyung Parka3, Monika K. Wiedmanna4, T S Kuana5, Susan E. Babcocka6, Luke J. Mawsta7, Paul Nealeya8 and Thomas F. Kuecha9

a1 jha@wisc.edu, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Chemistry, Madison, Wisconsin, United States

a2 cliu22@wisc.edu, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin, United States

a3 joopark@wisc.edu, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin, United States

a4 mwiedmann@wisc.edu, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin, United States

a5 kuan@albany.edu, University at Albany, Department of Physics, Albany, New York, United States

a6 babcock@engr.wisc.edu, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin, United States

a7 mawst@engr.wisc.edu, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin, United States

a8 nealey@engr.wisc.edu

a9 kuech@engr.wisc.edu, University of Wisconsin, Chemical Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin, United States

Abstract

Templated growth for the fabrication of semiconductor nanostructures such as quantum dots and lattice-mismatched structures has been employed in this study. Self assembly of block copolymers (BCP) has been exploited to create a regular array of nanoscale patterns on a substrate to generate the growth template. These patterned templates were used for the selective area growth of pseudomorphic quantum dots, allowing for precise control over the dot size and spatial distribution. Strain relaxation in lattice-mismatched structures grown past the pseudomorphic limit was also studied. Analysis of the grown structures suggests that this approach using block copolymer templating followed by selective growth can be used for defect reduction in lattice-mismatched materials.

(Received April 21 2010)

(Accepted June 03 2010)

Key Words:

  • epitaxy;
  • defects;
  • III-V
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