MRS Proceedings

Table of Contents - Volume  1272  - Symposia KK/LL/NN/OO/PP – Integrated Miniaturized Materials-From Self-Assembly to Device Integration  

Editors : C.J. Martinez, J. Cabral, A. Fernandez-Nieves, S. Grego, A. Goyal, Q. Lin, J.J. Urban, J.J. Watkins, A. Saiani, R. Callens, J.H. Collier et al

Articles

Using Peptide Hetero-assembly to Trigger Physical Gelation and Cell Encapsulation

2010 MRS Spring Meeting.

Andreina Parisi-Amona1, Cheryl Wong Po Fooa2, Ji Seok Leea3, Widya Mulyasasmitaa4 and Sarah Heilshorna5

a1 andreina@stanford.edu, Stanford University, Bioengineering, Stanford, California, United States

a2 cherylwongpofoo@gmail.com, Stanford University, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford, California, United States

a3 jiseok.lee@stanford.edu, Stanford University, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford, California, United States

a4 widyam@stanford.edu, Stanford University, Bioengineering, Stanford, California, United States

a5 heilshorn@stanford.edu, Stanford University, Materials Science and Engineering, 476 Lomita Mall, McCullough Building, Room 246, Stanford, California, 94305-4045, United States

Abstract

Stem cell transplantation holds tremendous potential for the treatment of various trauma and diseases. However, the therapeutic efficacy is often limited by poor and unpredictable post-transplantation cell survival. While hydrogels are thought to be ideal scaffolds, the sol-gel phase transitions required for cell encapsulation within commercially available biomatrices such as collagen and Matrigel often rely on non-physiological environmental triggers (e.g., pH and temperature shifts), which are detrimental to cells. To address this limitation, we have designed a novel class of protein biomaterials: Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogels (MITCH) that are recombinantly engineered to undergo gelation by hetero-assembly upon mixing at constant physiological conditions, thereby enabling simple, biocompatible cell encapsulation and transplantation protocols. Building upon bio-mimicry and precise molecular-level design principles, the resulting hydrogels have tunable viscoelasticity consistent with simple polymer physics considerations. MITCH are reproducible across cell-culture systems, supporting growth of human endothelial cells, rat mesenchymal stem cells, rat neural stem cells, and human adipose-derived stem cells. Additionally, MITCH promote the differentiation of neural progenitors into neuronal phenotypes, which adopt a 3D-branched morphology within the hydrogels.

(Received March 25 2010)

(Accepted June 14 2010)

Key Words:

  • biomaterial;
  • biomimetic (assembly);
  • polymer
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