Public Health Nutrition

Monitoring and surveillance

The prevalence and correlates of taking folic acid and vitamin supplements among adults aged ≥45 years with CVD

Guixiang Zhaoa1 c1, Earl S Forda1, Chaoyang Lia1 and Ali H Mokdada2

a1 Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, Mailstop K66, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA

a2 Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

Abstract

Objective To examine the prevalence and likelihood of taking folic acid or vitamin supplements among adults with CHD or stroke v. adults without these conditions.

Design A cross-sectional Behavioural Risk Factor Surveillance System survey was conducted in twelve states of the United States and Puerto Rico in 2006. Self-reported data from participants were collected.

Setting The United States.

Subjects US non-institutionalised adults (n 41 792), aged ≥45 years.

Results Of all participants, 5445 had CHD and 2076 had stroke. Significantly higher percentages of women than men reported taking folic acid or vitamin supplements. After adjustment for potential confounders, women with CHD had a significantly lower adjusted prevalence (AP) and adjusted OR (AOR) than women without CHD for taking folic acid less than one time per d (AP = 3·9 % v. 5·5 %; AOR = 0·56; 95 % CI 0·39, 0·81), for taking folic acid one to four times per d (AP = 50·0 % v. 57·5 %; AOR = 0·68; 95 % CI 0·60, 0·79), and for taking vitamin supplements (AP = 60·9 % v. 69·9 %; AOR = 0·66; 95 % CI 0·57, 0·76). Men with CHD had a significantly higher AP (50·4 % v. 46·2 %) and AOR (1·17; 95 % CI 1·02, 1·33) of taking folic acid one to four times per d than men without CHD. In both sexes, adults with stroke were as likely as those without to take these supplements.

Conclusions Substantial variations in the prevalence and likelihood of taking folic acid or vitamin supplements exist by gender and by CHD status, but not by stroke status.

(Received November 02 2009)

(Accepted January 20 2010)

(Online publication March 03 2010)

Correspondence

c1 Corresponding author: Email GZhao@cdc.gov

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