Epidemiology and Infection

Original Papers

Other infections

Pregnancy-associated listeriosis

K. A. JACKSONa1 c1, M. IWAMOTOa1 and D. SWERDLOWa1

a1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

SUMMARY

Infection by Listeria monocytogenes in pregnant women may result in fetal loss or invasive disease in the newborn. We examined listeriosis cases reported through the U.S. Listeria Initiative during 2004–2007. Cases were classified as pregnancy-associated if illness occurred in a pregnant woman or an infant aged <28 days. Of 758 reported Listeria cases, 128 (16·9%) were pregnancy-associated. Maternal infection resulted in four neonatal deaths and 26 (20·3%) fetal losses. Invasive illnesses in newborns (n=85) were meningitis (32·9%) and sepsis (36·5%). Pregnant women with Listeria were more likely to report Hispanic ethnicity (52·8% vs. 25·6%, respectively; OR 3·3 95% CI 2·2–4·8) than mothers giving live birth in the USA during 2005 and were more likely to report consumption of Mexican-style cheese (OR 2·6, 95% CI 1·6–4·2) than were non-pregnant patients with Listeria infection. Pregnant woman comprised a considerable proportion of reported listeriosis cases. Further declines in pregnancy-associated listeriosis will require education about avoiding high-risk foods, and continued regulatory and industry efforts to decrease Listeria in foods.

(Accepted January 15 2010)

(Online publication February 17 2010)

Correspondence:

c1 Author for correspondence: K. A. Jackson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop D63, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. (Email: gqv8@cdc.gov)

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