Journal of Child Language

Articles

Long-term effects of preterm birth on language and literacy at eight years*

ANNALISA GUARINIa1 c1, ALESSANDRA SANSAVINIa1, CRISTINA FABBRIa1, SILVIA SAVINIa1, ROSINA ALESSANDRONIa2, GIACOMO FALDELLAa2 and ANNETTE KARMILOFF-SMITHa3

a1 Department of Psychology, University of Bologna

a2 Institute of Neonatology, University of Bologna

a3 Birkbeck Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, University of London

ABSTRACT

The aims of this study were to investigate whether specific linguistic difficulties in preterm children persist at eight years and to examine the interrelationships between language and literacy in this population, compared with a control group of full-term children. Sixty-eight monolingual Italian preterms and 26 chronologically matched controls were recruited. Language (grammar comprehension, lexical production and phonological awareness), literacy (reading comprehension, reading and writing) and general cognitive development were investigated. Results showed no general delay in preterms, but slight difficulties in specific linguistic abilities (grammar, lexicon, phoneme synthesis and deletion of the first syllable), more difficulties in literacy (speed in reading and accuracy in writing) and certain correlations among competencies turning out to be different from the control group. In conclusion, our study established that a partially atypical trajectory emerged in preterms, showing specific long-term effects of preterm birth on language and literacy development.

(Received July 01 2008)

(Revised February 03 2009)

(Online publication August 24 2009)

Correspondence:

c1 Address for correspondence: A. Guarini, Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat, 5, 40127 Bologna, Italy. Tel: +39 051 2091875. Fax: +39 051 243086. Email: annalisa.guarini@unibo.it

Footnotes

[*] This research was supported by research grants from the University of Bologna (Basic Oriented Research ex 60% 2004, 2005, 2006; University Research Project 2004–2007; Marco Polo fellowship; Strategic Project, 2007–2009, ‘Precoci abilità comunicativo-linguistiche e cognitive: rischi associati alla nascita pretermine’). We would like to thank the children and parents for their participation in the research, and Giulia Aquilano for her help with the medical examination. We are also grateful to the teachers and director of Ferrarin Primary School of Bellaria. We would like to thank Rossella Miglio and Serena Broccoli for their statistical advice. Finally we would like to thank Daniela Brizzolara and Anna Maria Chilosi for their suggestions concerning the tests of lexical production and grammar comprehension, and Paola Bonifacci, Cristina Santinelli and Silvana Contento for the Italian version of the K-BIT.