Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy

  • Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy / Volume 38 / Issue 04 / July 2010, pp 383-398
  • Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2010. The online version of this article is published within Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies must be obtained for commercial re-use.
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1352465810000214 (About DOI), Published online: 24 June 2010
  • OPEN ACCESS
Cambridge Journals Online - CUP Full-Text Page
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy (2010), 38:383-398 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2010. The online version of this article is published within Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies must be obtained for commercial re-use.
doi:10.1017/S1352465810000214

Accelerated Publication

Intensive Cognitive Therapy for PTSD: A Feasibility Study


Anke Ehlersa1 c1, David M. Clarka1, Ann Hackmanna2, Nick Greya3, Sheena Linessa3, Jennifer Wilda3, John Manleya3, Louise Waddingtona3 and Freda McManusa4

a1 NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust and King's College London, UK
a2 University of Oxford, UK
a3 NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust and King's College London, UK
a4 University of Oxford, UK
Article author query
ehlers a [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
clark dm [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
hackmann a [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
grey n [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
liness s [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
wild j [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
manley j [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
waddington l [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
mcmanus f [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

Abstract

Background: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) of anxiety disorders is usually delivered in weekly or biweekly sessions. There is evidence that intensive CBT can be effective in phobias and obsessive compulsive disorder. Studies of intensive CBT for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are lacking. Method: A feasibility study tested the acceptability and efficacy of an intensive version of Cognitive Therapy for PTSD (CT-PTSD) in 14 patients drawn from consecutive referrals. Patients received up to 18 hours of therapy over a period of 5 to 7 working days, followed by 1 session a week later and up to 3 follow-up sessions. Results: Intensive CT-PTSD was well tolerated and 85.7 % of patients no longer had PTSD at the end of treatment. Patients treated with intensive CT-PTSD achieved similar overall outcomes as a comparable group of patients treated with weekly CT-PTSD in an earlier study, but the intensive treatment improved PTSD symptoms over a shorter period of time and led to greater reductions in depression. Conclusions: The results suggest that intensive CT-PTSD is a feasible and promising alternative to weekly treatment that warrants further evaluation in randomized trials.

Keywords:Posttraumatic stress disorder; cognitive behaviour therapy; intensive treatment; treatment outcome; treatment acceptability

Correspondence:

c1 Reprint requests to Anke Ehlers, Department of Psychology PO77, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. E-mail: anke.ehlers@kcl.ac.uk


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