Social Policy and Society

Articles

Power without Representation? The House of Lords and Social Policy

Hugh Bochela1 and Andrew Deftya2

a1 Department of Policy Studies, University of Lincoln, Lincoln E-mail: hbochel@lincoln.ac.uk

a2 Department of Policy Studies, University of Lincoln, Lincoln E-mail: adefty@lincoln.ac.uk

Abstract

In the past the House of Lords has generally, and arguably for good reasons, been ignored in discussions of the making and scrutiny of welfare. However, it has always played some role in this field, particularly in the scrutiny and passage of legislation, and since the removal of the bulk of hereditary Peers in 1999, some writers have argued that the House has become more assertive. This article examines the attitudes of Peers, including a comparison with the views of Members of Parliament, and draws a number of conclusions about the role of the upper House in relation to social policy.