British Journal of Nutrition

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British Journal of Nutrition (2010), 103:1452-1460 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © The Authors 2009
doi:10.1017/S0007114509993497

Full Papers

Microbiology

The effect of a multispecies probiotic on the composition of the faecal microbiota and bowel habits in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients treated with antibiotics


Catherina J. M. Koninga1 c1, Daisy Jonkersa1a2, Hauke Smidta3, Frans Romboutsa4a5, Herman-Jan Penningsa6, Emiel Woutersa6a7, Ellen Stobberingha2 and Reinhold Stockbrüggera1

a1 Division of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Research Institute NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Maastricht, The Netherlands
a2 Division of Medical Microbiology, Research Institute NUTRIM, MUMC, University Hospital Maastricht, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands
a3 Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Agrotechnology and Food Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
a4 Laboratory of Food Microbiology, Department of Agrotechnology and Food Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
a5 Winclove Bio Industries B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands
a6 Department of Respiratory Medicine, Centre for Integrated Rehabilitation of Organ Failure (CIRO), Horn, The Netherlands
a7 Department of Respiratory Medicine, Research Institute NUTRIM, MUMC, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Article author query
koning cjm [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
jonkers d [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
smidt h [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
rombouts f [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
pennings hj [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
wouters e [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
stobberingh e [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
stockbrügger r [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

Abstract

Short-term antibiotic treatment profoundly affects the intestinal microbiota, which may lead to sustained changes in microbiota composition. Probiotics may restore such a disturbance. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of a multispecies probiotic on the faecal microbiota during and after antibiotic intake in patients with a history of frequent antibiotic use. In this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, thirty chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with antibiotics for a respiratory tract infection received 5 g of a multispecies probiotic or placebo twice daily for 2 weeks. Faecal samples were collected at 0, 7, 14 and 63 d. Changes in the composition of the dominant faecal microbiota were determined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Changes in bacterial subgroups were determined by quantitative PCR and culture. Bowel movements were scored daily according to the Bristol stool form scale. During and after antibiotic treatment, DGGE-based similarity indices (SI) were high ( ≥ 84 %) and band richness was relatively low, both remaining stable over time. No difference in SI was observed between patients with and without diarrhoea-like bowel movements. The multispecies probiotic had a modest effect on the bacterial subgroups. Nevertheless, it affected neither the composition of the dominant faecal microbiota nor the occurrence of diarrhoea-like bowel movements. The dominant faecal microbiota was not affected by antibiotics in this COPD population, suggesting an existing imbalance of the microbiota, which may also have contributed to the lack of effect by probiotic intake.

(Received July 21 2009)

(Revised November 17 2009)

(Accepted November 18 2009)

(Online publication December 21 2009)

Key Words:Probiotics; Antibiotics; PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis; Intestinal microbiota; Bowel movements

Correspondence:

c1 Corresponding author: Catherina J. M. Koning, fax +31 433875006, email c.koning@fdg-guest.unimaas.nl

Footnotes

Abbreviations: AAD, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; DGGE, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis; SI, similarity indices


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