Behavioral and Brain Sciences

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Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2010), 33:34-35 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010
doi:10.1017/S0140525X09991725

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The generation game is the cooperation game: The role of grandparents in the timing of reproduction


Rebecca Seara1 and Thomas E. Dickinsa2

a1 Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics, London WC2A 2AE, United Kingdom. r.sear@lse.ac.uk http://personal.lse.ac.uk/SEAR/
a2 School of Psychology, University of East London, London E15 4LZ, United Kingdom. dickins@uel.ac.uk http://www.uel.ac.uk/psychology/staff/tomdickins.htm
Article author query
sear r [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
dickins te [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

Abstract

Coall & Hertwig (C&H) demonstrate the importance of grandparents to children, even in low fertility societies. We suggest policy-makers interested in reproductive timing in such contexts should be alerted to the practical applications of this cooperative breeding framework. The presence or absence of a supportive kin network could help explain why some women begin their reproductive careers “too early” or “too late.”

Grandparental investment: Past, present, and future David A. Coall and Ralph Hertwig School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. david.coall@uwa.edu.au http://www.uwa.edu.au/people/david.coall; Department of Psychology, University of Basel, 4055 Basel, Switzerland. ralph.hertwig@unibas.ch http://www.psycho.unibas.ch/hertwig


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