Neuron Glia Biology

  • Neuron Glia Biology / Volume 5 / Special Issue 1-2 / May 2009, pp 3-11
  • Copyright © Cambridge University Press [2009]. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1740925X09990202 (About DOI), Published online: 13 August 2009
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Neuron Glia Biology (2009), 5:3-11 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © Cambridge University Press [2009]. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
doi:10.1017/S1740925X09990202

Research Article

Electrical signalling properties of oligodendrocyte precursor cells


Yamina Bakiria1, David Attwella1 c1 and Ragnhildur Káradóttira2

a1 Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT, UK
a2 MRC Centre for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Cambridge Centre for Brain Repair and Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK
Article author query
bakiri y [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
attwell d [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
káradóttir r [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

Abstract

Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have become the focus of intense research, not only because they generate myelin-forming oligodendrocytes in the normal CNS, but because they may be suitable for transplantation to treat disorders in which myelin does not form or is damaged, and because they have stem-cell-like properties in that they can generate astrocytes and neurons as well as oligodendrocytes. In this article we review the electrical signalling properties of OPCs, including the synaptic inputs they receive and their use of voltage-gated channels to generate action potentials, and we describe experiments attempting to detect output signalling from OPCs. We discuss controversy over the existence of different classes of OPC with different electrical signalling properties, and speculate on the lineage relationship and myelination potential of these different classes of OPC. Finally, we point out that, since OPCs are the main proliferating cell type in the mature brain, the discovery that they can develop into neurons raises the question of whether more neurons are generated in the mature brain from the classical sites of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and the hippocampal dentate gyrus or from the far more widely distributed OPCs.

KeywordsMyelin; OPC; NG2; stem cell; neuron

Correspondence:

c1 Correspondence should be addressed to: David Attwell, Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT, UK phone: (+44)-20-7679-7342 email: d.attwell@ucl.ac.uk


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