Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

Short Review

Neuropsychological outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting

OLA A. SELNESa1 c1 and REBECCA F. GOTTESMANa2

a1 Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

a2 Cerebrovascular Division, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Abstract

Short- and long-term cognitive declines after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass have been reported, but the frequency, severity, nature, and etiology of postoperative cognitive changes have been difficult to quantify. Current studies have corrected the principal methodological shortcoming of earlier studies by including control groups, and have shown that while early postoperative cognitive decline does occur in some patients, it is generally mild and reversible by 3 months after surgery. Late cognitive changes do occur, but comparison with patients undergoing off-pump surgery or those being treated medically suggests that these changes are not specific to CABG or more specifically to the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. (JINS, 2010, 16, 221–226.)

(Received May 04 2009)

(Reviewed October 09 2009)

(Accepted October 09 2009)

Correspondence:

c1 Correspondence and reprint requests to: Ola A. Selnes, Division of Cognitive Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1620 McElderry Street, Reed Hall East – 2, Baltimore, MD 21205-2189. E-mail: oselnes@jhmi.edu