Epidemiology and Infection

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Epidemiology and Infection (2010), 138:340-346 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009
doi:10.1017/S0950268809990586

Original Papers

Salmonellae and cholera

Sporadic Salmonella enterica serotype Javiana infections in Georgia and Tennessee: a hypothesis-generating study


L. S. CLARKSONa1 c1, M. TOBIN-D'ANGELOa1, C. SHULERa1, S. HANNAa2, J. BENSONa3 and A. C. VOETSCHa4

a1 Georgia Division of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, USA
a2 Tennessee State Health Department, Nashville, TN, USA
a3 Georgia Public Health Laboratory, Atlanta, GA, USA
a4 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA
Article author query
clarkson ls [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
tobin-d'angelo m [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
shuler c [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
hanna s [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
benson j [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
voetsch ac [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

SUMMARY

From 1996 to 2004, the incidence of Salmonella Javiana infections increased in FoodNet, the U.S. national active foodborne disease surveillance programme. Contact with amphibians and consumption of tomatoes have been associated with outbreaks of S. Javiana infection. To generate and test hypotheses about risk factors associated with sporadic S. Javiana infections, we interviewed patients with laboratory-confirmed S. Javiana infection identified in Georgia and Tennessee during August–October 2004. We collected data on food and water consumption, animal contact, and environmental exposure from cases. Responses were compared with population-based survey exposure data. Seventy-two of 117 identified S. Javiana case-patients were interviewed. Consumption of well water [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4·3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·6–11·2] and reptile or amphibian contact (aOR 2·6, 95% CI 0·9–7·1) were associated with infection. Consumption of tomatoes (aOR 0·5, 95% CI 0·3–0·9) and poultry (aOR 0·5, 95% CI 0·2–1·0) were protective. Our study suggests that environmental factors are associated with S. Javiana infections in Georgia and Tennessee.

(Accepted July 13 2009)

(Online publication September 02 2009)

Key Words:Epidemiology; Salmonella; Salmonella enterica; salmonellosis; zoonoses

Correspondence:

c1 Author for correspondence: L. S. Clarkson MPH, Georgia Division of Public Health, Epidemiology Branch, 2 Peachtree St, NW, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA. (Email: lsclarkson@dhr.state.ga.us)


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