The Journal of Politics

ARTICLES

Violent Conflict and the Spread of HIV/AIDS in Africa

Zaryab Iqbala1 and Christopher Zorna2

a1 Pennsylvania State University

a2 Pennsylvania State University

Abstract

It has been widely speculated that violent conflict acts as a key contributor to the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Yet to date no empirical examination of the conflict-HIV relationship has been conducted. Drawing on work in political science and public health, we set forth a theoretical framework for understanding this potential relationship and go on to present data on the spatio-temporal dispersion of HIV/AIDS in 43 African countries during the period from 1997 to 2005. We then assess the association between domestic and international conflict and levels of HIV/AIDS infection while controlling for a range of other influential factors. Our analyses support a clear positive relationship between both international and domestic conflict and climbing HIV/AIDS prevalence, as well as significant palliative effects for education and economic development on the incidence of HIV/AIDS.

(Received May 12 2007)

(Accepted May 23 2009)

Footnotes

Zaryab Iqbal is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

Christopher Zorn is Professor of Political Science at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

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