Parasitology



Direct characterization of Blastocystis from faeces by PCR and evidence of zoonotic potential


U. PARKAR a1, R. J. TRAUB a1, S. KUMAR a2, M. MUNGTHIN a3, S. VITALI a4, S. LEELAYOOVA a3, K. MORRIS a5 and R. C. A. THOMPSON a1c1
a1 WHO Collaborating Centre for the Molecular Epidemiology of Parasitic Infections and the State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre, School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, South Street, Western Australia 6150, Australia
a2 Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Selangor 50603, Malaysia
a3 Department of Parasitology, Phramongkutklao College of Medicine, 315 Ratchawithi Road, Ratchathewi, 10400, Bangkok, Thailand
a4 Perth Zoo, South Perth, Western Australia 6151, Australia
a5 Science Division, Department of Conservation and Land Management, Wildlife Place, Woodvale WA 6026, Australia

Article author query
parkar u   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
traub rj   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
kumar s   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mungthin m   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
vitali s   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
leelayoova s   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
morris k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
thompson rc   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

In vitro propagation followed by PCR, and a PCR-based method capable of the direct detection of Blastocystis in faeces were utilized to detect Blastocystis from various hosts in Australia, including primates and their handlers from the Perth Zoo. In addition, Blastocystis isolates from dogs and humans living in a localized endemic community in Thailand were also characterized genetically. PCR-based detection directly from faeces was shown to be more sensitive compared with in vitro culture for the detection of Blastocystis. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of Blastocystis isolates amplified utilizing in vitro techniques prior to PCR revealed that this method favoured the preferential amplification of Blastocystis subtype 5 over subtype 1. This study is the first to provide molecular-based evidence supporting the zoonotic potential of Blastocystis in dogs, possums and primates in a natural setting.

(Received July 18 2006)
(Revised August 16 2006)
(Accepted August 23 2006)
(Published Online October 19 2006)


Key Words: Blastocystis; in vitro amplification; zoonoses; molecular characterization.

Correspondence:
c1 WHO Collaborating Centre for the Molecular Epidemiology of Parasitic Infections, School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, South Street, Western Australia 6150. Tel: +61 8 9360 2466. Fax: +61 8 9310 4144. E-mail: a.thompson@murdoch.edu.au


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