Epidemiology and Infection

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Epidemiology and Infection (2010), 138:183-191 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009
doi:10.1017/S0950268809991191

Original Papers

Influenza

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus outbreak in a school in London, April–May 2009: an observational study


L. CALATAYUDa1a2, S. KURKELAa2a3, P. E. NEAVEa4, A. BROCKa4, S. PERKINSa4, M. ZUCKERMANa5, M. SUDHANVAa5, A. BERMINGHAMa2, J. ELLISa2, R. PEBODYa2, M. CATCHPOLEa2, R. HEATHCOCKa4 and H. MAGUIREa6 c1

a1 European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (EPIET), European Centre for Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden
a2 Health Protection Agency, Centre for Infections, London, UK
a3 European Public Health Microbiology Training Programme (EUPHEM), European Centre for Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden
a4 South-East London Health Protection Unit, London, UK
a5 Health Protection Agency, London Regional Laboratory, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
a6 Health Protection Agency, Regional Epidemiology Unit, London, UK
Article author query
calatayud l [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
kurkela s [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
neave pe [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
brock a [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
perkins s [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
zuckerman m [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
sudhanva m [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
bermingham a [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
ellis j [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
pebody r [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
catchpole m [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
heathcock r [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
maguire h [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

SUMMARY

On 29 April 2009, an imported case of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection was detected in a London school. As further cases, pupils and staff members were identified, school closure and mass prophylaxis were implemented. An observational descriptive study was conducted to provide an insight into the clinical presentation and transmission dynamics in this setting. Between 15 April and 15 May 2009, 91 symptomatic cases were identified: 33 were confirmed positive for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection; 57 were tested negative; in one the results were unavailable. Transmission occurred first within the school, and subsequently outside. Attack rates were 2% in pupils (15% in the 11–12 years age group) and 17% in household contacts. The predominant symptoms were fever (97%), respiratory symptoms (91%), and sore throat (79%). Limited spread in the school may have been due to a combination of school closure and mass prophylaxis. However, transmission continued through household contacts to other schools.

(Accepted October 28 2009)

(Online publication November 20 2009)

Key Words:Infection control; infection transmission; outbreaks; respiratory infections; swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus

Correspondence:

c1 Author for correspondence: Dr H. Maguire Health Protection Agency, Regional Epidemiology Unit, 7th Floor, Holborn Gate, 330 High Holborn, WC1V 7PP London, UK. (Email: helen.maguire@hpa.org.uk)


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