Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Open Peer Commentary

Immunobiology of neural transplants and functional incorporation of grafted dopamine neurons

Jeffrey B. Blounta1, Takeshi Kondoha1, Lisa L. Pundta1, John Conrada1, Elizabeth M. Jansena3 and Walter C. Lowa1a2a3 c1

a1 Departments of Neurosurgery, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455.

a2 Departments of Physiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455.

a3 Departments of Program in Neuroscience, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455. lowwalt@maroon.tc.umn.edu

Abstract

In contrast to the views put forth by Stein & Glasier, we support the use of inbred strains of rodents in studies of the immunobiology of neural transplants. Inbred strains demonstrate homology of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Virtually all experimental work in transplantation immunology is performed using inbred strains, yet very few published studies of immune rejection in intracerebral grafts have used inbred animals.

Correspondence:

c1 Address for correspondence: Walter C. Low, Dept. of Neurosurgery, University of Minnesota Medical School, 2001 Sixth Street, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455

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