Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy



Brief Clinical Reports

DO COGNITIVE AND EXPOSURE TREATMENTS IMPROVE VARIOUS PTSD SYMPTOMS DIFFERENTLY? A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL


Karina Lovell  a1 c1 , Isaac M. Marks  a2 , Homa Noshirvani  a2 , Sian Thrasher  a3 and Maria Livanou  a2
a1 University of Manchester, U.K.
a2 Institute of Psychiatry, London, U.K.
a3 Oxfordshire, U.K.

Article author query
lovell k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
marks im   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
noshirvani h   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
thrasher s   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
livanou m   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

This study (part of a larger one whose main outcomes were reported by Marks, Lovell, Noshirvani, Thrasher, & Livanou, 1998) investigated the impact of exposure therapy and cognitive restructuring alone and combined on the individual symptoms of PTSD and on associated features. Exposure therapy was expected to act mainly on fear and avoidance, and cognitive restructuring mainly on detachment, restricted range of affect, and associated features of PTSD. Seventy-seven PTSD outpatients were randomly allocated to one of four treatments: 1) exposure alone; 2) cognitive restructuring alone; 3) combined exposure and cognitive restructuring; or 4) relaxation (placebo control). The active treatments were superior to relaxation in improving clusters of PTSD symptoms and associated features and some but not all individual symptoms and associated features of PTSD. Exposure and cognitive restructuring improved almost all individual symptoms similarly.


Key Words: Posttraumatic stress disorder; treatment; behavioural and cognitive treatments.

Correspondence:
c1 Reprint requests and requests for extended report to Katrina Lovell, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, Coupland III Building, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, U.K. E-mail: karina.lovell@man.ac.uk


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